REBLOG: 15 authors to read based on your favorite drinks

Reblog of a July 2015 BookLikes post.

 

 

No matter if it’s a cup of tea or coffee, lemonade or a glass of wine, books and drinks go well together. This universal truth has been discovered not only by avid readers but also writers, some of whom became as well known for their drinking habits as for their literary achievements. Taking advantage of the summer time and the permanent feeling of thirst, we’ve gathered light-hearted recommendations of 14 well known and read authors and their drinks. Find your match, sip, read, and enjoy the summer reading time.

 

 

Truman Capote called this cocktail his special “orange drink” so if you share his taste for upgraded orange juice, go for a screwdriver drink with one of Capote’s books in your hand.

Truman Capote
In this profession it’s a long walk between drinks.

 Truman Streckfus Persons, known as Truman Capote, was an American author, screenwriter and playwright, many of whose short stories, novels, plays, and nonfiction are recognized literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1958) and the true crime novel In Cold Blood (1966).

 

Truman Capote’s most popular books on BookLikes:
In Cold Blood - Truman Capote Breakfast at Tiffany's and Three Stories - Truman Capote Other Voices, Other Rooms - Truman Capote The Grass Harp, Including A Tree of Night and Other Stories - Truman Capote Music for Chameleons - Truman Capote

 

 

Ernest Hemingway is known for his love for cocktails: Mohito, Martini, vermouth… Living in Havana, though, must have left a trace in his preferences and we bet Mojito was hight on the author’s top drinks list. If it’s also on yours, have a sip.

Ernest Hemingway
My mojito in the Bodeguita del Medio and my daiquiri in the Floridita.
– Quote on the wall of La Bodeguita del Medio, Havana, Cuba

Ernest Hemingway ranks as the most famous of twentieth-century American writers. Hemingway has been regarded less as a writer dedicated to his craft than as a man of action who happened to be afflicted with genius. When he won the Nobel Prize in 1954, Time magazine reported the news under Heroes rather than Books.

Ernest Hemingway’s most popular books on BookLikes
The Old Man and the Sea - Ernest Hemingway The Sun Also Rises - Ernest Hemingway A Farewell to Arms - Ernest Hemingway For Whom the Bell Tolls - Ernest Hemingway A Moveable Feast - Ernest Hemingway

 

 

Asked by a translator to explain his text William Faulkner said:
I have absolutely no idea of what I meant. You see, I usually write at night. I always keep my whiskey within reach; so many ideas that I can’t remember in the morning pop into my head.

If you’re fond of whiskey, try Faulkner’s favorite drink: mint julep.

William Faulkner's favorite drink  William Faulkner

William Faulkner
Civilization begins with distillation.

His first poem was published in The New Republic in 1919. His first book of verse and early novels followed, but his major work began with the publication of The Sound and the Fury in 1929.

 

William Faulkner’s most popular books on BookLikes:
The Sound and the Fury - William Faulkner Light in August (The Corrected Text) - William Faulkner Absalom, Absalom! - William Faulkner As I Lay Dying - William Faulkner Sanctuary: The Corrected Text - William Faulkner

 

 

Martini IS James Bond. James Bond IS Ian Fleming. If you like martini, you ARE James Bond for us. 

 

Ian Fleming
Never say ‘no’ to adventures.
Always say ‘yes,’ otherwise you’ll lead a very dull life.

His first job was with Reuters News Agency where a Moscow posting gave him firsthand experience with what would become his literary bête noire — the Soviet Union. During World War II he served as Assistant to the Director of Naval Intelligence and played a key role in Allied espionage operations. After the war he worked as foreign manager of the Sunday Times, a job that allowed him to spend two months each year in Jamaica. Here, in 1952, at his home Goldeneye, he wrote a book called Casino Royale — and James Bond was born.

 

Ian Fleming’s most popular books on BookLikes
Live and Let Die - Ian Fleming From Russia With Love - Ian Fleming Goldfinger - Ian Fleming Doctor No - Ian Fleming On Her Majesty's Secret Service - Ian Fleming

 

 

Cosmo was named the sexiest drink thanks to Candace Bushnell who popularize the drink in her Sex and the City series. If you adore Carrie Bradshaw, the Sex and the City’s main character, grab cosmo and read/write on!

  Candace Bushnell

Candace Bushnell
I make mistakes. That’s what I do. I speak without thinking, I act without knowing. I drink so much that I can barely walk… I’m a fantastic lover though, and an amazing friend. God knows I mean well.

– Carrie Bradshaw, Sex and the City

Candace Bushnell is the critically acclaimed, international best-selling author of Killing Monica, Sex and the City, Summer and the City, The Carrie Diaries, One Fifth Avenue, Lipstick Jungle, Trading Up, and Four Blondes. Sex and the City, published in 1996, was the basis for the HBO hit series and two subsequent blockbuster movies. Lipstick Jungle became a popular television series on NBC, as did The Carrie Diaries on the CW.

 

Candace Bushnell’s most popular books on BookLikes
The Carrie Diaries - Candace Bushnell Sex and the City - Candace Bushnell Four Blondes - Candace Bushnell Lipstick Jungle - Candace Bushnell Summer and the City - Candace Bushnell

 

 

If you like Margarita, read Jack Kerouac who developed his love for this drink during his trip through Mexico. 

 

Jack Kerouac
Don’t drink to get drunk. Drink to enjoy life.

Jack Kerouac’s writing career began in the 1940s, but didn’t meet with commercial success until 1957, when On the Road was published. The book became an American classic that defined the Beat Generation. His parents had immigrated as very young children from the Province of Quebec, Canada, and Kerouac spoke a local French Canadian-American dialect before he spoke English.

 

Jack Kerouac’s most popular books on BookLikes:
On the Road - Jack Kerouac The Dharma Bums - Jack Kerouac Big Sur - Jack Kerouac, Aram Saroyan The Subterraneans - Jack Kerouac Desolation Angels - Jack Kerouac, Joyce Johnson

 

 

Raymond Carver was Hemingway’s mate not only in writing but also boozing. Some of the records reveal that Bloody Mary cocktail, which he named “heart starter”, made his hangover breakfast. We definitely do not recommend this kind of diet but if you’d like to give the tomatoes a good stir, choose Bloody Mary.

 

Raymond Carver
Drinking’s funny. When I look back on it, all of our important decisions have been figured out when we were drinking.
Even when we talked about having to cut back on drinking, we’d be sitting at the kitchen table or out at the picnic table with a six-pack or whiskey.

What We Talk About When We Talk About Love

Raymond Carver was born in Clatskanie, Oregon, in 1938. His father was a saw-mill worker and his mother was a waitress and clerk. He married early and for years writing had to come second to earning a living for his young family. Despite, small-press publication, it was not until Will You Please Be Quiet Please? appeared in 1976 that his work began to reach a wider audience.

 

Raymond Carver’s most popular books on BookLikes 
What We Talk About When We Talk About Love - Raymond Carver Cathedral - Raymond Carver Short Cuts: Selected Stories - Raymond Carver, Robert Altman The Best American Short Stories of the Century - John Updike, Philip Roth, Bernard Malamud, Martha Gellhorn, Vladimir Nabokov, Gish Jen, Ernest Hemingway, Raymond Carver, Cynthia Ozick, Tim O'Brien, Harold Brodkey, Robert Penn Warren, Joyce Carol Oates, Flannery O'Connor, William Faulkner, William Saroyan, Saul Bellow Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? - Raymond Carver

 

 

If you like gin and tonic read J.K. Rowling or F. Scott Fitzgerald’s. Both authors highlighted this drink as their favorite.

F. Scott Fitzgerald

J.K. Rowling
JK Rowling grew up in Chepstow, Gwent where she went to Wyedean Comprehensive. Jo left Chepstow for Exeter University, where she earned a French and Classics degree, and where her course included one year in Paris. As a postgraduate she moved to London to work at Amnesty International, doing research into human rights abuses in Francophone Africa. She started writing the Harry Potter series during a Manchester to London King’s Cross train journey, and during the next five years, outlined the plots for each book and began writing the first novel.

 

J.K. Rowling’s most popular books on BookLikes:
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone - J.K. Rowling, Mary GrandPré Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire - J.K. Rowling, Mary GrandPré The Casual Vacancy - J.K. Rowling The Silkworm - J.K. Rowling, Robert Galbraith The Tales of Beedle the Bard - Beedle the Bard, J.K. Rowling

 

F. Scott Fitzgerald
First you take a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes you.

F. Scott Fitzgerald was one of the major American writers of the twentieth century — a figure whose life and works embodied powerful myths about that nation’s dreams and aspirations. Fitzgerald was talented and perceptive, gifted with a lyrical style and a pitch-perfect ear for language. He lived his life as a romantic, equally capable of great dedication to his craft and reckless squandering of his artistic capital. He left us masterpieces such as The Great Gatsby and Tender Is the Night; and a gathering of stories and essays that together capture the essence of the American experience.

 

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s most popular books on BookLikes:
The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald Tender Is the Night - F. Scott Fitzgerald The Beautiful and Damned - F. Scott Fitzgerald The Love of the Last Tycoon - F. Scott Fitzgerald Gatsby Girls - F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

 

Jane Austen was well known for her feminist life approach, her language was witty, actions full of determination and books ground-breaking. This also refers to her culinary preferences. She adored ices and red wine.

 

Jane Austen
But in the meantime for Elegance & Ease & Luxury . . .
I shall eat Ice & drink French wine, & be above Vulgar Economy.

Jane Austen was an English novelist whose works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature.

 

Jane Austen’s most popular books on BookLikes
Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen Emma - Jane Austen, Fiona Stafford Mansfield Park - Jane Austen Jane Austen's Letters - Deirdre Le Faye, Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice: The Wild and Wanton Edition - Michelle M. Pillow, Annabella Bloom, Jane Austen

 

 

J.R.R. Tolkien admitted to be a beer lover. C.S. Lewis is known for his love to this golden liquor as well. Not so strange then that those two spent enjoyable time in pubs reading and discussing their writing, having several pints and paying close attention to what they were drinking. Reportedly, Lewis liked a good draft bitter off the wood, disliked bottled and hated canned beer. 

J.R.R. Tolkien
John Ronald Reuel Tolkien was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor, best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion.

 

J.R.R. Tolkien’s most popular books on BookLikes
The Fellowship of the Ring - J.R.R. Tolkien The Hobbit - J.R.R. Tolkien The Two Towers - J.R.R. Tolkien The Silmarillion - J.R.R. Tolkien, Ted Nasmith, Christopher Tolkien The Children of Húrin - J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien, Alan Lee

 

C.S. Lewis
I can’t imagine a man really enjoying a book and reading it only once.

Clive Staples Lewis was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year.

 

C.S. Lewis’ most popular books on BookLikes
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe - C.S. Lewis The Magician's Nephew - C.S. Lewis The Voyage of the Dawn Treader - C.S. Lewis, Pauline Baynes Prince Caspian - C.S. Lewis The Silver Chair - C.S. Lewis, Pauline Baynes

 

 

Honore de Balzac’a coffee addiction may be too much even for a hard-core coffee lover — the author is believed to drink up to 50 cups a day! L. Frank Baum, author of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, was much more moderate coffee drinker with four or five breakfast cups of sweet white coffee a day. How about you?

 

Honoré de Balzac
As soon as coffee is in your stomach, there is a general commotion.
Ideas begin to move…similes arise, the paper is covered.
Coffee is your ally and writing ceases to be a struggle.

Honoré de Balzac was a French novelist and playwright. His magnum opus was a sequence of short stories and novels collectively entitled La Comédie humaine, which presents a panorama of French life in the years after the 1815 fall of Napoleon Bonaparte.

 

Honoré de Balzac’s most popular books on BookLikes
Père Goriot - Honoré de Balzac Cousin Bette - Francine Prose, Honoré de Balzac, Kathleen Raine Eugénie Grandet - Christopher Prendergast, Honoré de Balzac, Sylvia Raphael Lost Illusions - George Saintsbury, Honoré de Balzac, Ellen Marriage The Unknown Masterpiece; and, Gambara - Richard Howard, Arthur C. Danto, Honoré de Balzac

 

 

If you prefer a hot aromatic tea than cocktails or coffee, make sure to follow George Orwell’s golden rules of making a perfect cup of tea

 

George Orwell
One strong cup of tea is better than twenty weak ones. All true tea lovers not only like their tea strong, but like it a little stronger with each year that passes.

Eric Arthur Blair who used the pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and commitment to democratic socialism. Commonly ranked as one of the most influential English writers of the 20th century, and as one of the most important chroniclers of English culture of his generation, Orwell wrote literary criticism, poetry, fiction, and polemical journalism. He is best known for the dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) and the allegorical novella Animal Farm (1945).

 

George Orwell’s most popular books on BookLikes
1984 - George Orwell, Erich Fromm Animal Farm - George Orwell The Portable Atheist: Essential Readings for the Nonbeliever - John Updike, George Eliot, John Stuart Mill, Thomas Hobbes, Richard Dawkins, Daniel C. Dennett, Carl Sagan, Mark Twain, H.L. Mencken, Christopher Hitchens, Ian McEwan, Salman Rushdie, Joseph Conrad, Ibn Warraq, Martin Gardner, Karl Marx, Bertrand Russell, A.C. Grayling, Pe Homage to Catalonia - Lionel Trilling, George Orwell Shooting an Elephant - George Orwell

 

Sources:

 

Original post: 15 authors to read based on your favorite drinks – Themis-Athena’s Garden of Books — reblogged from BookLikes

Merken

Merken

Advertisements

Summer Splurges (AKA: Be Good to Yourself)

The Colour of Poison: A Sebastian Foxley Medieval Mystery (Volume 1) - Toni MountWars of the Roses - Charles RossLast White Rose: The Secret Wars of the Tudors - Desmond SewardBlood Sisters: The Women Behind the Wars of the Roses - Sarah GristwoodMary Tudor: The First Queen - Linda Porter

Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen - Anna WhitelockThe Sugar Planter's Daughter - Sharon MaasThe Princes of Ireland - Edward RutherfurdThe Rebels of Ireland - Edward RutherfurdThe Chronicles of Narnia CD Box Set: The Chronicles of Narnia CD Box Set - C.S. Lewis, Kenneth Branagh

Largely inspired by Samantha Wilcoxson’s recommendations following up on my read of her books Plantagenet Princess, Tudor Queen and Faithful Traitor – as well as looking forward to book 3 of her Tudor Women trilogy – I’ve been on a minor shopping spree lately. Not all of these are Samantha’s recommendations, but that’s the way book browsing goes … one thing leads to another!

  • Toni Mount: The Colour of Poison – actually ordered already before my exchange with Samantha on which books she recommends in connection with her own novels, though another recommendation of hers, too; what a pity I probably won’t be receiving it before the end of its “book of the month” status in More Historical Than Fiction.
  • Charles Ross: The Wars of the Roses – though I’ve already got Trevor Royle’s book on the same subject, but it can’t hurt to get another one just for comparison’s sake;
  • Desmond Seward: The Last White Rose – since, after all, the Yorks didn’t just die out all at once together with Richard III at Bosworth in 1485;
  • Sarah Gristwood: Blood Sisters, The Women Behind the Wars of the Roses – since women played an important part during that period and it’s time we finally took note of them … and not just Margaret of Anjou, either (which is why Samantha’s books on Elizabeth of York and Margaret Pole are such a welcome read);
  • Linda Porter: Mary Tudor, The First Queen – since there’s more to Mary I than is hidden behind her epithet “Bloody Mary”;
  • Anna Whitelock: Mary Tudor, Princess, Bastard, Queen – ditto (and two books are always better than one, see above)

 … and while I was at it, I also did a bit of wish list cleanup, ordering:

  • Sharon Maas: The Sugar Planter’s Daughter (book 2 of her Winnie Cox trilogy; fresh from the publisher’s press);
  • Edward Rutherfurd: The Princes of Ireland and The Rebels of Ireland;
  • David Suchet: Poirot and Me (since my reviews of some of the Poirot dramatizations starring Suchet are up next for copying over to my WordPress blog)
  • … and then I also found a dirt cheap (used, but near new) offer of the Chronicles of Narnia audiobook set read by Derek Jacobi, Kenneth Branagh, Patrick Stewart, Michael York, Alex Jennings, Lynn Redgrave and Jeremy Northam – which I of course had to have as well.

 And look, the first lovely books already made it to their new home, too:

 

But anyway, I obviously also needed to make space on my wish list for all the other books I found when following up on Samantha’s recommendations:

  • Lisa Hilton: Queens Consort, England’s Medieval Queens (which I hope is going to live up to Helen Castor’s She-Wolves: The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth I);
  • Dan Jones: The Hollow Crown (since I’ve already got his earlier book on the Plantagenets …);
  • Charles Ross: Richard III (by all accounts still the standard biography);
  • Chris Skidmore: Richard III (the most recent incarnation of Richard III biographies);
  • Amy Licence: Richard III, the Road to Leicester (I guess there goes my resolution not to give in to the publicity craze of the recent[ish] discovery of his bones);
  • Amy Licence: Elizabeth of York, Forgotten Tudor Queen (and really, I swear it was this book and the RIII bio by Charles Ross that led me to Licence’s book on RIII in the first place);
  • Alison Weir: Elizabeth of York, the First Tudor Queen (one of Samantha’s major “go-to” books for background information on Elizabeth; also, I own and rather like Weir’s bio of Eleanor of Aquitaine);
  • Hazel Pierce: Margaret Pole, 1473-1541, Loyalty, Lineage and Leadership (on which Samantha says she relied substantially in writing Faithful Traitor) and
  • Susan Higginbotham: Margaret Pole (brand new and due out in August 2016).

And then … well, there’s this absolutely gorgeous and super-nice tea and spice store in Frankfurt that my best friend and I discovered when I was living in Frankfurt way back in 2003.  Shelves crammed with goodies from all over the world and an amazing staff … even after I moved to Bonn, we just kept going there; and we still try to make it down there at least once or twice a year.  So last Saturday we decided another splurge was overdue, took to the road – and returned home late in the afternoon laden with delicacies.  This was my share of the bounty:

  • A small bag of Nanhu Da Shan Qinxin Oolong (the prize catch of last Saturday’s shopping trip; and yes, they do actually let you try all of their products in their store);
  • * A foursome of Kusmi tea blends (Kashmir tchai, ginger lemon green, and a double serving of spicy chocolate);
  • One of their homemade rice & spice mixes (in this instance, a blend of Indian basmati rice with currants, cashew nuts, coconut flakes, lemon pepper, cinnamon, sea salt, cardamom, ginger, and pieces of dried mango, apricot, papaya, and cranberries, going by the fanciful name Maharani Rice … one of my absolute favorites);
  • A bottle of Stokes Sweet Chilli Sauce (my kitchen just isn’t complete without this stuff, it goes on practically everything);
  • A bottle of Belberry Spicy Mango Ketchup (new to me, tried it in the store and instantly loved it);
  • A duo of Sal de Ibiza (green pepper and lemon, and ginger and lemon grass);
  • A lidded Chinese dragon tea mug that will go well with the two (differently-colored) mugs in the same style that I’ve already got
  • … and a collection of their very own recipes, all of which they also serve up (though obviously not all at the same time) for tasting purposes in their store.; this particular collection being recipes created by a charming lady from Sri Lanka named Rajitha who has been part of their team since practically forever.

 Alright, so I guess I did splurge.  In my defense, though, I’ll mention that I won’t be able to travel at all this year, nor actually take a whole lot of vacation time or other time off work, so I’m having to make to with what’s available by way of compensation … and is there any better compensation than books and food?

Rex Stout, et al.: The Nero Wolfe Cookbook

Invitation to the Brownstone

“I beg you not to entrust these dishes to your cook unless he is an artist. Cook them yourself, and only for an occasion that is worthy of them. They are items for an epicure, but are neither finicky nor pretentious; you and your guests will find them as satisfying to the appetite as they are pleasing to the palate. None is beyond your abilities if you have the necessary respect for the art of fine cooking – and are willing to spend the time and care which an excellent dish deserves and must have. Good appetite!”

The above quote from the account one of Nero Wolfe’s first investigations (“Too Many Cooks,” 1937) serves as one of several introductory notes to this compilation of recipes from Rex Stout’s famous mystery series involving the New York epicurean, orchid lover and heavy-weight detective whose exploits have long become as indelible a part of literary history as those of Sherlock Holmes, Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple and Lord Peter Wimsey. And the quote not only sums up to perfection Wolfe’s view of the meals served in his house; it also – consequently – provides a taste of the approach one should adopt in using this cookbook. For unlike many other literature-related recipe collections, “The Nero Wolfe Cookbook” need not rely on a great many third-party sources to determine what the great detective might have consumed; a key part of the mysteries themselves are the descriptions of Wolfe’s meals, and Wolfe’s (as well as his Swiss chef Fritz Brenner’s) attitude towards food in general.

All of the recipes presented here were initially developed by chef Michael S. Romano and tested personally by Rex Stout and New Yorker food critic Sheila Hibben. And it’s all there, from Eggs au Beurre Noir, griddle cakes, and apricot omelet to Fritz Brenner’s various duck, duckling, and pork dishes, Wolfe’s “relapses,” and even the complete menu served by Fritz on the occasion of the annual Ten for Aristology dinner in “Poison a la Carte:” Blinis with Sour Cream (of course without the fatal dose of arsenic someone had added, to Fritz’s eternal horror and shame, to one of the guests’ plates!), Green-Turtle Soup, Flounder Poached in White Wine, Mussel and Mushroom Sauce, Roast Pheasant, Suckling Pig, Chestnut Croquettes, Salad with Devil’s Rain Dressing and Cheese. As you would expect with cuisine as refined as this (and given that we’re talking, after all, about the culinary arts of the early and mid-20th century), not all ingredients are easy to track down or even still available; turtles being the obvious example – and frankly, I don’t quite share Wolfe’s predilection for such things as starlings and marrow dumplings, either. But even foregoing those recipes, there are plenty of others to try your hand at, and to get a flavor of the culinary delights that fueled Wolfe’s and his “legman” and chronicler Archie Goodwin’s investigations.

In addition to the recipes, the book is lavishly garnished with quotes and excerpts from Rex Stout’s – err, excuse me, Archie Goodwin’s – narrations, providing the context in which individual dishes were served, as well as an array of photographs by renowned photo artists such as Norman and Lionel Wurts, Roy Perry, Samuel Gottscho, Andreas Feininger, John Muller, and Bernice Abbot; displaying the New York of the 1930s through the 1950s (by many considered the city’s golden years, and the heyday of Wolfe’s and Archie Goodwin’s career), with brownstones like Wolfe’s on West 35th Street and other fashionable residences (seen both from outside and inside), 5th Avenue, the Financial District and Times Square, the Empire State Building, Central Park and other green spots, Madison Square Garden, Fulton and other markets, the Staten Island Ferry, Grand Central and Penn Stations, and New York restaurants of various degrees of elegance and refinement. Thus, this is much more than “just” a cookbook – in fact, it’s an introduction to Wolfe’s entire world and style of life; tastefully uniting the essence of Archie Goodwin’s manifold accounts in a single volume.

“I have not a great hope that many people will eat superior meals because they buy this book and use it,” cautions Fritz Brenner in his own foreword. “The facts about food and cooking can be learned and understood by anyone with good sense, but if the feeling of the art of cooking is not in your blood and bones the most you can expect is that what you put on your table will be mangeable. … But I do not think this book will make your food any the worse. At least it should help with some of the facts.” And that, after all, is plenty already, I think. So savor, enjoy, and, in Wolfe’s words – good appetite!

Merken

Duncan MacDonald / Robb Sagendorph: Old-Time New England Cookbook

New England Cooking at Its Best

How do you combine traveling and cooking if both are your hobbies? Very simple – after you’ve savored the local cuisine of the place you have visited in restaurants, you take home a cookbook to try and prepare some of those dishes at home.

I bought the “Old-Time New England Cookbook” during my first visit to the region, and it fast became a staple in my cooking, whether for friends and parties or just for myself. This book, an unabridged republication of 1958’s “Rain, Hail, and Baked Beans” (Ives Washburn, Inc., New York), is a wonderful introduction to traditional New England cooking, from classics such as clam and other chowders, lobster and Concord grapes, to bear marinade (a mixture of cider, orange juice and spices) and Governor Bradford’s plum pudding. Arranged not by dishes but by seasons, the book introduces the reader, in addition to the flavors of the local cuisine, to those of the region’s particular atmosphere and, through numerous little anecdotes, describes the origin and the popularity of individual dishes, and traces their development to the products available at any given time of the year. A particular treat are the recipes from New England inns reproduced at the end of the book – I have found the Bangor House Fish Chowder to be a particular crowd pleaser, but every dish I have tried so far went over very well with my guests. All recipes are well-described and easy to follow, and none contains ingredients that are hard or impossible to come by. If you’re looking for a well-done and yet very affordable introduction to New England cooking, written with obvious love for the region’s people, nature and seasons as well as for its cuisine, you should definitely give this book a try.

Merken

Merken

Lorenz Books: Around the World Cookbook

Around the World in 350+ Recipes

“Holidays in far flung places have increased our awareness of different foods, and restaurants on every street corner now offer dishes that no so long ago would have been unfamiliar,” the editors of this volume say in their introduction. And indeed: This is nothing less than a lavishly illustrated and marvelously edited culinary trip around the whole world, with stops in North and Sub-Saharan Africa, China, Japan, Indonesia, Thailand, India, the Middle East, Italy, Spain, France, North America, the Caribbean and Mexico.

All recipes are broken down into small, easy to follow steps, demonstrated in numerous photos. Ingredients are listed with quantities given both in the American and the metric measuring system, thus making the recipes easily accessible wherever you live. Numerous cook’s tips add to the cooking experience and ensure its success. Most of the ingredients are easy to come by, although some may require a trip to a specialty food market. You’ll find plenty of now well-known favorites from the regions represented here, as well as rare and new creations you might not have thought of yourself.

All in all, the book includes more than 350 recipes. If you’re interested in one regional cuisine in particular, you may want to get specialized cookbooks from that particular country or region in addition. But as an introduction and a primer, this volume is very hard to beat.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Highlights
Regional and International Classics
  • Avgolemono/Aarshe Saak (Greece and several Middle Eastern countries)
  • Baklava (Iran)
  • Boreks (Turkey)
  • Boston Baked Beans (U.S.)
  • Chateaubriand with Sauce Béarnaise (France)
  • Chicken and Prawn Jambalaya (Cajun)
  • Chicken Tikka Masala (India)
  • Chilaquiles (Mexico)
  • Chimichangas (Mexico)
  • Chocolate Profiteroles (France)
  • Chorizo in Red Wine (Spain)
  • Coleslaw (U.S.)
  • Couscous (Morocco; several recipes)
  • Crème Caramel (France)
  • Crêpes Suzette (France)
  • Curries (several recipes from Indonesia, Thailand, Burma and India)
  • Deep-Fried Bananas (Indonesia)
  • Falafel (Egypt)
  • Fried Plantains (Caribbean)
  • Frijoles Refritos (Mexico)
  • Hot and Sour Soup (China)
  • Houmus (Middle East; several countries)
  • Kebabs (recipes from several Middle Eastern countries)
  • Khoresh (Iran; several recipes)
  • Lamb Korma (India)
  • Lamb Pelau (Caribbean)
  • Louisiana Seafood Gumbo (Cajun)
  • Marinated Olives (Spain)
  • Marinated Vegetable Antipasto (Italy)
  • Mole Poblano (Mexico)
  • Mulligatawny (India)
  • New England Clam Chowder (U.S.)
  • Onigiri (Japanese rice balls)
  • Onion Soup (France)
  • Oysters Rockefeller (U.S.)
  • Paella (Spain)
  • Pasta all’ Arrabbiata (Italy)
  • Pecan Pie (Cajun)
  • Peking Duck (China)
  • Penne alla Carbonara (Italy)
  • Pineapple Fried Rice (Thailand)
  • Pizza (various recipes – Italy, of course …)
  • Potatoes Dauphinois (France)
  • Potato Tortilla (Spain)
  • Quesadillas (Mexico)
  • Ratatouille (France)
  • Satés (several recipes from Indonesia and Thailand)
  • Stir-Fries (several recipes from China, Indonesia and Thailand)
  • Sweet and Sour dishes (several recipes from China, Indonesia and Thailand)
  • Szechuan Chicken (China)
  • Tabbouleh (Lebanon)
  • Tacos (Mexico)
  • Tagines (recipes from several North African countries)
  • Tandoori Chicken (India)
  • Tarka Dhal (India)
  • Tiramisu (Italy)
  • Tom Ka Gai (Thailand)
  • Tostadas (Mexico)
  • Wonton Soup (China)
  • Zabaglione (Italy)
Some Unique Recipes
  • Artichoke Rice Cakes with Melting Manchego (Spain)
  • Asparagus with Orange Sauce (France)
  • Baked Fish in Banana Leaves (Thailand)
  • Baked Fish with Nuts (Egypt)
  • Chicken and Pistachio Paté (France)
  • Chicken with Tomatoes and Honey (Morocco)
  • Crab with Green Rice (Mexico)
  • Glazed Garlic Prawns (India)
  • Monkfish Parcels (Spain)
  • Nigerian Meat Stew
  • Salmon in Mango and Ginger Sauce (Caribbean)
  • Sesame Seed Prawn Toasts (China)
  • Stuffed Peaches with Amaretto (Italy)
  • Tanzanian Fish Curry
  • Thyme and Lime Chicken (Caribbean)
  • Tomato and Onion Chutney (India)
  • Veal in Nut Sauce (Mexico)

Merken

Merken

Merken

Moosewood Collective: Moosewood Restaurant Cooks at Home – Fast and Easy Recipes for Any Day

 Fast and Furiously Delicious Recipes

I’m a Cornell grad, and one thing I remember with particular pleasure about my time in Ithaca, NY are those occasional forays down the Hill for lunch or (more likely) dinner at Moosewood, for years one of the local standout restaurants. Although not a vegetarian, I try not to eat meat every day of the week; and for a tasty, healthy alternative, there just isn’t anything better than Moosewood’s recipes. No question that I had to get their cookbook – several of them, actually – before I finally left town.

“Moosewood Restaurant Cooks at Home” begins with two short introductory sections about the use of time and nutritional analysis. The recipes are then grouped into individually introduced sections covering soups, dips, spreads and quick breads, salads and sides, dressings, salsas and sauces, main dish salads, gains, beans, pastas, stews, stir-fries and sautes, fish, sandwiches, filled tortillas, and pizzas, eggs and pancakes, and desserts. The book closes with a pantry list, a guide to ingredients, chapters on preparation and techniques, fresh herbs, menu planning and quantities (including liquid and dry measure and temperature conversion tables – particularly helpful for those of us who live in a “metric system” country); as well as a number of special lists, grouping the featured recipes according to their qualification as nondairy and vegan, kid-pleasers, recipes preparable in 30 minutes or less, and recipes suitable for entertaining, buffets and pot-lucks. What I like most about this book – besides the overall outstanding quality of the recipes and the fact that most of them are very quick and easy to prepare – are the countless little insider tips regarding the shopping for as well as preparation and storage of idividual dishes and their combination with other dishes or ingredients, in addition to the background information on the names, provenance and cultural context of the many Non-Western recipes (not to mention that so many of those recipes are included in the first place).

It’s hard for me to pick a personal favorite; there are so many … for soups, I guess I’d pick the Mexican tomato lime soup, for dips the spicy peanut dip, for sides the mushrooms in lemon marinade, for dressings either the creamy pine nut vinaigrette or the lemon sesame dressing, for sauces the hazelnut and red peppers sauce, for main dish salads the sweet potato salad, for grains the herbed lemon pilaf with almonds … and for salsas, pastas, stews, tortillas, pizzas, eggs, pancakes and desserts, every single one! (Sorry, really can’t make up my mind there; it’s more a question of mood and, of course, what ingredients I happen to have handy.) But whether you’re just cooking for yourself or for family and friends, there should be something for everyone in this book; regardless whether you are vegetarian/vegan or not. Highly recommended!

Merken

Merken

Sarah R. Labensky / Alan M. Hause: On Cooking

Culinary Arts

“Cookery is become an art, a noble science; cooks are gentlemen.” – Robert Burton, British author (1621).

One of the many neat features of studying at Cornell University is that, even if you’re not enrolled in its famous School of Hotel Administration, you can attend one of the cooking and wine tasting classes organized especially for non-Hotel School students, and get at least a flavor of the five star culinary instruction provided by the chefs teaching at that school. (That is, you can do so if you’re willing to get up an extra hour or two early on the morning of non-Hotel School student enrollment, and if you’re lucky enough to beat the crowds or at least slip in as a substitute participant.) In addition to numerous recipes and pieces of valuable advice, information and memories – particularly of the last night, on which we had to put together a four-course meal, fine dining style, complete with menu, garnishments and perfectly laid table – Cornell’s “cooking class” has enriched my kitchen by two items I have since found it very hard to do without: A professional grade chef’s knife, and Sarah Labensky’s and Alan Hause’s “On Cooking,” which we used as our textbook.

Much more than that, however, “On Cooking” is in fact a near-complete reference on everything related to the culinary arts, from the history of cooking to new foods developed in the 20th century, from sanitation and safety to nutritional values, from recipe writing to menu composition, from knifes and other pieces of equipment to edible kitchen staples, from the principles of cooking to various techniques and food presentation – and of course, on every conceivable kind of food, from coffee, tea, spices and condiments to dairy products, stocks, sauces, soups, red and white meats, charcuterie, fish and shellfish, eggs, vegetables, potatoes, grains, pasta, salads, fruits, sandwiches, hors d’oeuvres, canapes, breads, pies, pastries, cookies, cakes, custards, creams and frozen desserts. Along the way, numerous tables, diagrams and pictures illustrate and exemplify the given information, making it easy to digest and memorize. The book concludes with an extensive bibliography and recommendations for further reading, and a detailed glossary of essential culinary terms.

Recipes are chosen to match individual chapters, and provide both a practical application and a more profound understanding of the respective chapters’ subject matter. They include everything from American and international classics to numerous more unusual dishes.

At 1100+ pages a veritable brick, despite its size “On Cooking” has become as much a key part of my kitchen as my chef’s knife, my tea strainer and various other pieces of equipment. I don’t harbor any intentions of becoming a professional chef (nor any aspirations to even remotely that level of culinary skills), but I love to cook, and this is one of the cookbooks I’d be least likely to part with – ever.


On the last night of the cooking class offered by Cornell Hotel School to non-Hotel School students, with my Argentinian friend and classmate Victoria (winter 1998).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Highlights
Classic Recipes
  • Applesauce
  • Asian Chicken Salad
  • Baked Beans
  • Baked Potatoes
  • Barbecue Sauce
  • Béarnaise Sauce
  • Béchamel Sauce
  • Beef Stroganoff
  • Boeuf Bourguignon
  • Bolognese Sauce
  • Bordelaise Sauce
  • Broths
  • Brownies
  • Bûche de Noël
  • Burgers
  • Cannoli alla Siciliana
  • Carpaccio
  • Cassoulet
  • Cesar Dressing
  • Châteaubriand
  • Chicken Cacciatore
  • Chicken Curry
  • Chicken Fricassee
  • Chili con Carne
  • Chocolate Angel Food Cake
  • Chocolate Mousse
  • Chorizo
  • Clams Casino
  • Club Sandwich
  • Cobb Salad
  • Coleslaw
  • Consommés
  • Coq au Vin
  • Crème Brulée
  • Crêpes
  • Duck Confit
  • Eggs Benedict
  • Entrecôte Bordelaise
  • Falafel
  • Fettuccine Alfredo
  • Fillet of Sole Bonne Femme
  • Focaccia
  • Frangipane
  • French Onion Soup
  • Gazpacho
  • Gingerbread Cookies
  • Gnocchi
  • Gratin Dauphinois
  • Gravlax
  • Grilled Portabella Mushrooms
  • Guacamole
  • Hollandaise Sauce
  • Hummus
  • Hungarian Goulash
  • Hush Puppies
  • Kebabs
  • Ladyfingers
  • Lemon Curd
  • Macaroni and Cheese
  • Madeira Sauce
  • Madeleines
  • Matzo Balls
  • Mayonnaises
  • Meatloaf
  • Meringues
  • Minestrone
  • Mornay Sauce
  • Muffins
  • New England Clam Chowder
  • New York Cheesecake
  • Osso Buco
  • Oysters Rockefeller
  • Paella
  • Pepper Steak
  • Pesto
  • Pico de Gallo
  • Pies
  • Pilafs
  • Pizza
  • Polenta
  • Potato Salad
  • Quiche Lorraine
  • Ratatouille
  • Reuben Sandwich
  • Risottos
  • Roquefort Dressing
  • Rösti Potatoes
  • Sabayon
  • Salade Niçoise
  • Salsas
  • Scrambled Eggs
  • Sorbets
  • Spanakopitta
  • Spätzle
  • Spiced Cider
  • Sponge Cake
  • Stocks
  • Swedish Meatballs
  • Tartar Sauce
  • Tarts
  • T-bone Steak
  • Thai Noodle Salad
  • Thousand Islands Dressing
  • Toll House Cookies
  • Tortes
  • Tournedos Rossini
  • Veal Fricassee
Some Unusual Recipes:
  • Balsamic Raspberries
  • Beet Vinaigrette
  • Chilled Cherry Soup
  • Chocolate Flourless Cake
  • Cilantro Puree
  • Crayfish Butter
  • English Muffin Loaves
  • Figs with Berries and Honey Mousse
  • Goat Cheese Ravioli in Herbed Cream Sauce
  • Grilled Red Snapper Burger with Mango Ketchup
  • Grilled Seckel Pear with Sherry Bacon Vinaigrette
  • Grits and Cheddar Soufflé
  • Kirsch Mousse
  • Marinated Loin of Venison Roasted with Mustard
  • Nopal Cactus Salsa
  • Oatmeal Stout Ice Cream
  • Perfumed Shrimp Consommé
  • Pink Peppercorn Beurre Blanc
  • Pistachio Citrus Cheesecake
  • Potato Cheddar Cheese Bread
  • Potato-Ginger Puree
  • Quince Jam
  • Roast Pheasant with Cognac and Apples
  • Salmon Croquettes
  • Salmon and Sea Bass Terrine with Spinach and Basil
  • Sautéd Pork Medallions with Red Pepper and Citrus
  • Shallot Curry Oil
  • Spicy Sweet Potato and Chestnut Gratin
  • Stuffed Wontons with Apricot Sauce
  • Tex-Mex Turkey Sausage
  • Walnut Pesto
  • Wild Rice and Cranberry Stuffing
  • Zucchini Bread

 

Merken

Merken

Isabella Beeton: Mrs. Beeton’s Book of Household Management / Leo Tolstoy: War and Peace

Well, one day I may well get around to writing proper reviews of these two iconic books (both in their own way) after all, too. But until then, quite unapologetically, my Goodreads Celebrity Death Match Review Elimination Tournament entry will have to do …

Felines at War, or:
Celebrity Death Match Review Elimination Tournament Review: Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management (16) vs. War and Peace (17)

Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management (Oxford World's Classics) - Isabella Beeton    War & Peace - Leo Tolstoy, Anthony Briggs

Give a cat a fish...and he will come back every day expecting you to give him another fish.

With a satisfied flick of her tail, Mrs. B. groomed back into place two stray hairs that had come lose in her shining black fur during her foray into the pantry, then she snatched her prize – a delicious-looking fillet of salmon –, crossed the kitchen and made for the outside door. There, however, she stopped in her tracks, her every hair standing on end.

Assembled on the doorstep was the better part of the Russian emigré mob that had recently surfaced in the neighborhood, hungrily eying her salmon. Mrs. B. speed-assessed the situation and concluded that there was only one thing to do.

She turned tail and raced straight back into the kitchen with the Russians in hot pursuit, smashing through the heavy oak door and making it bang into the wall with the explosive force of a canon ball.

Breathlessly Mrs. B. made for the nearest counter where, in landing, she toppled a stack of plates and sent it clattering to the ground, which however only gave her a momentary respite as the Russians dodged the flat, flying missiles that splayed into pieces on the tiled kitchen floor. In passing she set spinning a large chef’s knife, which promptly buried itself into the sides of the most forward of her pursuers, an elegant Russian Blue female whose coat began to turn red as she remained behind with a gasp and a whimper. “Sweetest Natasha!” roared the leader of the mob, a bulky creature sporting scruffy fur of an indistinct color and the obvious bearing of the newly-rich, who now hefted himself to Mrs. B.’s hind paws. “I’ll make you pay for this, you dirty English tart – this means WAR!” He charged forward, careening into a sauce dish filled with melted butter which Mrs. B. had neatly sidestepped at the very last moment. The bulky Russian slithered through the pool of sticky yellow liquid that had spilled from the dish, straight into the hot iron thing that humans called a stove. Mrs. B. did not take the time to look back, but his momentous growl and the smell of singed fur told her that another one of her pursuers was evidently out of combat. Swiftly jumping down again from the counter, she ducked under the table in the direction of the opposite wall, now chiefly pursued by two sleek young males who looked like the brothers of the injured female Natasha, and by a meager, vicious-looking Donskoy. Scampering along the wall, Mrs. B. just barely managed to leap over a mouse trap which Natasha’s brothers, jockeying for position at her heels, noticed too late, and which promptly fastened itself to the first brother’s right front paw, making him go down with a yelp and causing the second brother and the Donskoy to tumble over him. This resulted in a momentary scuffle as the Russians disentangled themselves from each other with much clawing and screeching. Mrs. B. meanwhile leapt onto another counter and further up onto the spice rack above, from where she showered her reappearing pursuers (now reduced to the second brother and the Donskoy) with salvos of capers, flour, salt, pepper, and other assorted ground substances, sending earthenware containers flying right and left as she rushed forward, finally making a blind jump for the kitchen window ahead in the hope that it would not be locked.

The window was not locked. It nevertheless proved not to be a suitable exit route, either. For in it had appeared, seemingly out of nothing, another recent arrival to the neighborhood; a dark Chartreux who made up for his shortish legs by a ridiculously imperial manner. From day one, Mrs. B. had been as weary of him as she was of the Russian emigré mob.

The Chartreux graced Mrs. B.’s pursuers, who were sitting on the ground, squinting from pepper-burned eyes and busily cleaning large quantities of flour and spices from their fur, with a contemptuous sniff: “Leave this to me, you inept Russian peasants.” Then he turned to Mrs. B. “Madame,” he said, “I have come here to offer Peace. Indeed, I am offering you an entente tout à fait cordiale.” He eyed the fillet of salmon which, though slightly worse for wear, Mrs. B. was still holding firmly clenched between her teeth. “Now, if we were to divide this truly superb fish, and you were to give me half and you and those Russians were to split the …”

“Let me pass, Sir. NOW.” To actually voice this, Mrs. B. would have had to open her mouth and let go of the salmon, which was the farthest thing from her mind. But her demeanor and a determined growl made her point quite clearly enough.

“Tsk, tsk. Nobody sidesteps Napoleon.” As the Chartreux slightly shook his head, his claws burrowed into Mrs. B.’s neck, instantly drawing blood. Mrs. B. suppressed an unladylike squeak and relaxed her stance. Ridiculous upstart, she thought but this time tried hard not to convey by her manner, which instead she changed to utmost submissiveness. The flattery worked like a charm: slowly, the French male’s claws came out of her neck and he began to eye her curiously.

This was the moment she had been waiting for.

Suddenly tearing up Napoleon’s sides with her front claws and giving him as hard a push as she could, she turned and jumped onto the kitchen table, then scattered past the assorted copper pots, pans, bowls, spoons and ladles left to dry on a rack next to the sink. The quickly-recovering Chartreux hefted himself hard to her heels with a furious snarl. Misstepping ever so slightly, however, he upset the pile of pots and pans lying in his way, which left him scrambling for balance and ultimately landed him in the still half-filled sink. Before he had regained dry ground, Mrs. B. had at last made her escape through the kitchen door, leaving behind a field of destruction and barely in time to hear an angry human voice exclaim: “Now, what happened here, for Chrissakes? Dammed strays – get out of my kitchen AT ONCE! OUT, I said!”

A little later, lying on her favorite pillow and languidly licking a last drop of melted butter from her paw, Mrs. B. mused that collared salmon, lightly salted and with hot butter sauce on the side, actually made for quite a satisfactory dish. A piece of salmon, say 3 lbs., a high seasoning of salt, pounded mace, and pepper; water and vinegar, 3 bay-leaves …

She purred contentedly, curled up, and was soon fast asleep.

 :

Merken