Halloween Bingo 2019: Tracking Post — Blackout! (And bingos Nos. 12 and 13.)

 

Many thanks to Moonlight Reader and Obsidian Blue for hosting this game for the fourth year in a row, bigger and better than ever before!

Witih today’s call, I’ve blacked out my card, in addition to collecting my final bingos (nos. 12 and 13).

Somewhat to my surprise, after completing my books for my official bingo card at the end of September, I even managed to read enough extra books to put together a supplemental inofficial card throughout the month of October, so this year’s game has really exceeded my wildest expectations in every conceivable way!

 

My Official 2019 Bingo Card:

Weekly Status Updates and Reviews:

First Week
Second Week
Third Week
Fourth Week

 

The Books:

International Woman of Mystery: Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale and The Testaments – finished September 29, 2019.
Locked Room Mystery: Clayton Rawson: Death from a Top Hat – finished September 23, 2019.
Murder Most Foul: Michael Gilbert: Smallbone Deceased – finished September 13, 2019.
Psych: Sofi Oksanen: Fegefeuer (The Purge) – finished September 17, 2019.
Read by Flashlight or Candle Light: The Lady Detectives: Four BBC Radio 4 Crime Dramatisations – finished September 20, 2019.

DeadLands: Terry Pratchett: Monstrous Regiment – finished September 26, 2019.
Fear the Drowning Deep: Delia Owens: Where the Crawdads Sing – finished September 25, 2019.
Relics and Curiosities: Patricia Wentworth: Eternity Ring – finished September 10, 2019.
Dark Academia: James Hilton: Was It Murder? – finished September 1, 2019.
Modern Noir: Joy Ellis: The Guilty Ones – finished September 21, 2019.

Ghost Stories: Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten – finished September 1, 2019.
Gothic: Peter Ackroyd: Hawksmoor – finished September 9, 2019.
Free (Raven) Space: Agatha Christie: The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories – finished September 7, 2019.
Truly Terrifying: Bob Berman: Earth-Shattering – finished September 12, 2019.
Amateur Sleuth: Priscilla Royal: Wine of Violence – finished September 5, 2019.

Cryptozoologist: Terry Pratchett: Guards! Guards! – finished September 18, 2019.
Diverse Voices: Toni Morrison: Beloved – finished September 22, 2019.
Black Cat: Jim Butcher: The Aeronaut’s Windlass – finished September 16, 2019.
Creepy Crawlies: Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Gods of Jade and Shadow – finished September 7, 2019.
Country House Mystery: Anthony Rolls: Scarweather – finished September 14, 2019.

Spellbound: Zen Cho: Sorcerer to the Crown – finished September 6, 2019.
A Grimm Tale: Ellen Datlow & Terry Windling (eds.): The Wolf at the Door and Other Retold Fairy Tales – finished September 4, 2019.
Creepy Carnivals: Fredric Brown: The Dead Ringer – finished September 12, 2019.
Paint It Black: Trudi Canavan: The Magicians’ Guild – finished September 20, 2019.
Cozy Mysteries: Margery Allingham: The White Cottage Mystery – finished September 19, 2019.

 

My Square Markers

 

Called but not read

Read but not called

Read and Called

Center Square: Read and Called

 

The Extra Squares / Card and Books:

13: Rex Stout: And Be a Villain
Supernatural: Jennifer Estep: Kill the Queen
New Release: Sara Collins: The Confessions of Frannie Langton
Genre: Mystery: Catherine Louisa Pirkis: The Experiences of Loveday Brooke, Lady Detective
Romantic Suspense: Georgette Heyer: The Unfinished Clue
Terror in a Small Town: Ann Cleeves: Raven Black
Halloween: Agatha Christie: Hallowe’en Party
Monsters: Terry Pratchett: Pyramids
Shifters: Joan D. Vinge: Ladyhawke
Sleepy Hollow: Dennis Lehane: The Given Day
Film at 11: J.B. Priestley: An Inspector Calls
In the Dark, Dark Woods: Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness
Free (Raven) Square: Various Authors: The Rivals: Tales of Sherlock Holmes’ Rival Detectives
Grave or Graveyard: Kathy Reichs: Grave Secrets
Genre: Suspense: Tony Medawar (ed.) & Various Authors: Bodies from the Library 2
Southern Gothic: Sharyn McCrumb: The Unquiet Grave
Baker Street Irregulars: Joanne Harris: Gentlemen & Players
Darkest London: J.V. Turner: Below the Clock
Magical Realism: Joanne Harris: Chocolat
It was a dark and stormy night: Peter May: The Lewis Man
Full Moon: Edmund Crispin: Glimpses of the Moon
King of Fear: John Le Carré: Absolute Friends
Serial / Spree Killer: Steven Kramer, Paul Holes & Jim Clemente: Evil Has a Name
Classic Noir: Patricia Highsmith: Strangers on a Train
Classic Horror: Matthew G. Lewis: The Monk

Note: With regard to the extra squares, I added the image for the relevant square for every book completed (= “read”); and I am using my “called” markers for the main card to indicate “called and read”.

 

My Spreadsheet:

My Book Preselections Post: HERE

 

My Transfiguration Spells

Not used.

 

My “Virgin” Bingo Card:

Posted for ease of tracking and comparison.

 

 

Original post:
http://themisathena.booklikes.com/post/1942220/halloween-bingo-2019-tracking-post

All 61 squares revealed: 39 through 61 (Non-Genre-Specific Squares)

Reblogged from: Moonlight Reader

 

The remaining, non-genre specific squares – you can read anything that is horror, mystery, suspense or supernatural that otherwise fits the square prompt.

  

39. Thirteen (13): any book that relates to bad luck, superstition, or the number 13, either in the title/book/series/page count. Booklist linked here.

40. A Grimm Tale:  any fairy tale or retelling of fairy tales, folklore, legends, etc. Book list linked here.

41. Aliens: any mystery, horror, suspense or supernatural book that includes aliens, either here on earth, or in space. Book list linked here.

  

42. Creepy Carnivals:  horror/mystery/supernatural set in or concerning a carnival, amusement park, or other party/festival – think Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury, Joyland by Stephen King or Hallowe’en Party by Agatha Christie; Book list linked here.

43. Creepy Crawlies: this is a throw back from 2016! Books with bugs, snakes, spiders, worms and other things that slither, scuttle or crawl, includes viruses and other parasites. Book list linked here.

44. In The Dark, Dark Woods: a mystery, suspense, horror or supernatural book in which the forest/woods plays a significant role, or which has a forest/woods on the cover. Book list linked here.

  

45. Darkest London: mystery, horror, supernatural, or suspense set in London. Book list linked here.

46. Demons: Any book involving demons, demonic possession or other such elements. Book list linked here.

47. Diverse voices: written by an author of color. Book list linked here.

  

48. Doomsday:  anything related to the end of the world, doomsday cults, or a post-apocalypse world. Book list linked here.

49. Fear the Drowning Deep: books with sea-related elements: sea creatures, ships, and sharks. Book list linked here.

50. Full Moon: a book with an image of the moon on the cover, the word moon in the title, or where a full moon figures prominently in the story. Book list linked here.

  

51. Gothic: any book with significant: a genre or mode of literature and film that combines fiction and horror, death, and at times romance. Book list linked here.

52. Grave or Graveyard: Books that have a grave or graveyard on their covers, in their titles, or any book primarily set in a graveyard. Book list linked here.

53. Halloween: This is a combination of the “pumpkin” and the “halloween” squares from 2016. so, any book set on halloween or has halloween in the title or that has a pumpkin on the cover, or in the title, etc.. will work for this square. Book lists linked here: pumpkins and halloween.

  

54. Monsters: This square covers any crytpozoological or mythological creature that isn’t a vampire, werewolf, or demon. Or zombie. Book list linked here.

55. New Release: mystery, suspense, horror or supernatural that was published after 10/31/18.

56. Read by Flashlight or Candlelight: Back by popular request! Any mystery, suspense, supernatural or horror book – the trick here is to spend an hour or so reading by flashlight or candlelight. Take a picture and share it with us, if you want to!

  

57. Relics and Curiosities: concerning magical, supernatural or haunted objects, such as spell-books, talismans or swords; Book list linked here.

58. Sleepy Hollow: this is the new version of set in New England, with a shout-out to that most New England of all stories, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Book list linked here.

59. Free square: Our friend, Poe, is back for his fourth outing!

 

60. Black Cat: We haven’t seen this square since our first bingo game, back in 2016! Any book that has a black cat in the title, on the cover, or in the story. Book list linked here.

61. It Was A Dark and Stormy Night: This is another throwback to 2016 – any book that takes place on “a dark and stormy night.” Book list linked here.

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1933535/all-61-squares-revealed-39-through-61

Halloween Bingo 2019 PreParty — Question for 08/08 (Day 8): Favorite Past Halloween Bingo Squares?

Being more of a mystery than a horror reader, of course I like all of the mystery squares — as well as the squares adding diversity to the game (“Diverse Authors”, “Terrifying Women”, and the new “International Women of Mystery”) and the squares that allow me to sneak in a Terry Pratchett book or three (“Supernatural”, “Witches” / “Spellbound” — the latter also for other reasons).

But truth be told, the squares I am enjoying most are those calling for a specific topical reading prompt, e.g. “Full Moon”, “Creepy Carnivals”, or “In the Dark, Dark Woods”; as well as those calling for a specific regional or calendarial setting (“Darkest London”, “Southern Gothic”, “Set on Halloween”, etc.).  For one thing, these are the prompts that particularly showcase our bingo hosts’ creativity, and for another, what always amazes me is the wide selection of books that fit these categories — for each of them, you can go all the way from romantic suspense to the most gruesome and terrifying horror and still find something that matches the square’s requirements.  They’re also the squares that make me take the closest looks at the books on my TBR, reading book descriptions etc. and looking for matches, which in turn increases my anticipation of the game!

Here’s a compilation of my favorite squares from bingos past (in alphabetical order, regardless of year) … added to which, I have to say that I also love every single one of the new squares MR has so far introduced in connection with this year’s game.  To mark the fact that yet another thing about bingo I’m truly enjoying are the group and (impromptu) buddy reads, I’m also including the “Reads with BookLikes friends” square from the 2016 bingo card — even if group and buddy reads are by now such an ingrained part of the game that a square specifically calling for them seems highly superfluous at this point.

 

 

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1932865/halloween-bingo-2019-preparty-question-for-08-08-day-8-favorite-past-halloween-bingo-squares

Robert Galbraith (J.K. Rowling): Lethal White

Reading Status Updates

20  of 1350 Minutes

Slight change of plan … I guess I have a row to catch up on after all now!  (4th row on my card.)

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1793461/reading-progress-update-i-ve-listened-20-out-of-1350-minutes

 

215 of 1350 Minutes

“‘I’ve heard … that there may be photographs.’

‘Photographs,” repeated Strike.

“Winn can’t have them, of course.  If he had it would be all over.  But he might be able to find a way of getting hold of them, yes.’  He shoved the last piece of tarte in his mouth, then said, ‘Of course, there’s a chance the photographs don’t incriminate me.  There are no distinguishing marks, so far as I’m aware.’

Strike’s imagination frankly boggled.  He yearned to ask, ‘Distinguishing marks on what, Minister?’, but refrained.”

Bwahahaha — don’t tell me Rowling has somehow anticipated l’affaire champignon (mushroom)?  Well, of sorts, anyway?  Not that Britain doesn’t have a rich history of its own as far as these, um, situations are concerned …

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1793493/reading-progress-update-i-ve-listened-215-out-of-1350-minutes

 

1000 of 1350 Minutes

“Geraint was representing me at that event and it will go the way it always goes in the press when it all comes out.  It will have been my fault, all of it.  Because men’s crimes are always ours in the final analysis, aren’t they, Mr. Strike?  Ultimate responsibility always lies with the woman — who should have stopped it.  Who should have acted.  Who must have known.  Your failings are really our failings, aren’t they?  Because the proper role of the woman is carer, and there is nothing lower in this whole world than a bad mother.”

Well, well, Joanne.

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1793705/reading-progress-update-i-ve-listened-to-1000-out-of-1350-minutes

 

1025 of 1350 Minutes

Well, good for you, Robin.  This was long overdue.  I hope this time you’re going to really go through with it.

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1793709/reading-progress-update-i-ve-listened-to-1025-out-of-1350-minutes

 

1350 of 1350 Minutes

Wow.  What a book.


Totilas

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1793952/reading-progress-update-i-ve-listened-to-1350-out-of-1350-minutes

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Addendum:

On BookLikes, I had the following exchange with my friend Moonlight Reader regarding Robin’s story arc in book 3 of the series (Career of Evil) and book 4 (Lethal White):

Themis-Athena’s Garden of Books
When you were praising Robin in your review for book 2, that made me really curious how you were going to respond to this book. Because you’re not the only one who wanted to slap her more than a few times in this one … I spent the better part of the book being furious at her. — That said, I never thought of Michael as a suspect … just a major irritation (and a completely unnecessary complication in Robin’s life).

Moonlight Reader
My thinking of Matthew as a suspect was extremely brief, and didn’t make any sense. It was just one of things where I was like “could it be Shanker?” “could it be the police officer?” “could it be Matthew…” and then I immediately rejected it.

I was mad at Robin, but I can’t deny that her behavior represents a certain reality – young women get carried along into first marriages that they know will be a disaster pretty regularly, because they can’t figure out how to jump off the train that has left the station. [….]

Themis-Athena’s Garden of Books
There’s no question that Rowling has RL down pat in her characters — first and foremost, both Robin and Strike (and now I *really* want to see your response to book 4, in turn). I was chiefly mad at Robin because of her irresponsible behavior on the job — allowances for past history included; still, her whole set of expectations of Strike, of herself, of what she thought was due to her and what she could accomplish were so wildly off the mark and, more importantly, a serious risk to the whole operation, and to both her and Strike’s lives. But, yeah, of course I was yelling at her to get rid of Michael as well.

[…] And you’re right of course; there’s frequently a whole lot of (well-intentioned, but in fact fatal) social pressure going on in these types of situations. The way Rowling portrayed that was part of what I really liked about this book.