24 Festive Tasks: Door 7 – International Day for Tolerance: Task 3


Part of my library — these days, consisting only of the books I started collecting in the U.S. and after returning to Germany

When I moved to the U.S. some 20+ years ago, I had to “let go” of my entire library; all the books I had owned from childhood to my late 20s / early 30s: I was leaving a full-time job to go back to university and exchanging a 100+ sqm (1100 sq ft) / three-room apartment for student accommodation consisting of a single room.  Even leaving aside luggage restrictions and shipping costs, there was no way I was going to be able to bring my entire library.

If I could have entrusted my library to my mom, I would have done just that; I knew that she’d have guarded it for me like the apple of her eye — she knew it was my most prized possession in the entire world.  Unfortunately, that was not an option; my mom’s apartment was smaller than my own and, of course, entirely taken up by her own things, and there was not enough room in her basement, either.  So I reluctantly had to entrust my library to someone else, who made room in the basement of a building he owned.  Where, in due course, the whole basement was flooded; including the boxes containing my books, of course, almost none of which survived … of which fact, in turn, I was only informed when I returned to Germany several years later.  I still can’t think of any alternative storage option (commercial self-storage wasn’t an affordable thing in Germany at the time), and I suppose once the water damage had happened, it wasn’t ultimately of earthshattering importance precisely when I learned about it.  But do I regret it all?  You bet I do.  And guess who I’ve never entrusted with anything ever again, however small and unimportant it might be.  I’m not sure how “tolerant” or liberal others might find me as a general matter (in lifestyle choices and matters of equality probably much more so than in some other respects), but I am extremely unforgiving of any harm or damage when it comes to my books.  Always have been, and if anything, am now even more so.

(Task: The French expression for tolerance towards others is “laisser faire, laisser aller” (roughly: “let them do as they want, let it go”).  Have you ever “let go” a book (e.g., given it away or decided not to yield to the temptation to buy it) and later regretted that choice?)

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/2022586/24-festive-tasks-door-7-international-day-for-tolerance-task-3

24 Festive Tasks: Door 7 – International Day for Tolerance: Task 2 — AND — Door 11 – Thanksgiving: Task 1

This is something that ties two tasks together, so here we go:

My grandma kept baby / early childhood diaries for her children (including my mom) — and my mom continued the tradition when I was born.  She started to write it about three months after my birth and kept it going until I was kindergarten age.

The final entry in volume 1 of this diary (there are two volumes in total) concerns a fright that I gave her when I was 2 1/2 years old, shortly before we moved from Berlin (where I was born) to a village just south of Bonn (where my mom’s parents were living at the time, and where I would come to spend the biggest part of my childhood):

“You now enjoy playing with the neighborhood kids, [and] alone, too, in the street.  One day, however, you suddenly vanished and walked all alone to [your favorite playground on a nearby square]!   I spent 1 1/2 hours looking for you!  You’d almost gotten run over on [a large boulevard on the way].  So I am glad we are moving away from big city life now.”

The playground in question commanded so much of my particular attention because it featured an honest-to-God decommissioned steam locomotive that I absolutely adored “steering”.  According to the story as orally elaborated on by my mom later, I had apparently (and unbeknownst to her)  memorized the way to the playground, but not the way back home, and after having played blissfully and to my heart’s content for a while, had started to panic when it had dawned on me that I was lost.  By chance, a passing neighbor had recognized me and taken me back home.  How I’d managed to slip away in the first place, nobody knew — usually the mothers of the neighborhood kids took turns supervising us when we were playing outside (or even all came out to watch us), and there was never any word about anybody being recriminated for not having been on their guard.  So probably there was just a moment’s distraction … which turned out to be enough, however, to let me indulge in a sudden spark of instant gratification and walk away to play at being a steam engine driver, rather than continue playing with the other kids in my street. — Since nobody had actually watched me walking away, the “almost gotten run over on the way” bit was possibly my mom’s very understandable fear talking (if that had really happened, I’d likely have been taken back home immediately without ever reaching the playground — I did know my home address; it was one of the first things my parents taught me to say once I’d learned to speak, and I loved repeating it, so it’s likely it would have popped out if I had been asked), though of course this may have been what prompted the neighbor to recognize me when I was trying to find my way back home.


The (in)famous steam engine

(Door 7, Task 2: Share a story about yourself, or a story about your family that’s survived the generations, or share a particular tradition your family has passed on from generation to generation and if there’s a story behind why, tell us about it.

Door 11, Task 1: If you have kids or pets, tell us about something “bad” they did that was so funny you couldn’t help but forgive (“pardon”) them.  If you have neither kids nor pets, was there such an event in your own childhood – or with kids or pets in your family or circle of friends?)

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/2020645/24-festive-tasks-door-7-international-day-for-tolerance-task-2-and-door-11-thanksgiving-task-1

24 Festive Tasks: Door 7 – International Day for Tolerance: Task 4

I’ve been lucky enough to have been able to visit a fair number of World Heritage Sites already — I don’t explicitly go out to “collect” visits to them, but whenever I’m traveling and one of these sites is in the vicinity, I’ll at least try to include it in my plans.

Of the places I have not visited yet, two are at the very top of my list: Lillelara’s pick, Agkor (Wat), and … Machu Picchu.  And however much I might be interested in pretty much any other place in the world, if it comes down to “one — and one only”, as you might have guessed from my post about that long-ago trip to Mexico and Guatemala, anything “Precolumbian civilizations” will virtually always win the day.  Especially if it’s the capital of one of the most legendary and powerful Precolumbian empires (that of the Incas), is acutely in danger of vanishing forever if its protection is not jacked up something sharpish, and has got this sort of breathtaking a location … I mean, just look at it!

From the UNESCO website:

“Machu Picchu stands 2,430 m above sea-level, in the middle of a tropical mountain forest, in an extraordinarily beautiful setting. It was probably the most amazing urban creation of the Inca Empire at its height; its giant walls, terraces and ramps seem as if they have been cut naturally in the continuous rock escarpments. The natural setting, on the eastern slopes of the Andes, encompasses the upper Amazon basin with its rich diversity of flora and fauna.

Embedded within a dramatic landscape at the meeting point between the Peruvian Andes and the Amazon Basin, the Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu is among the greatest artistic, architectural and land use achievements anywhere and the most significant tangible legacy of the Inca civilization. Recognized for outstanding cultural and natural values, the mixed World Heritage property covers 32,592 hectares of mountain slopes, peaks and valleys surrounding its heart, the spectacular archaeological monument of “La Ciudadela” (the Citadel) at more than 2,400 meters above sea level. Built in the fifteenth century Machu Picchu was abandoned when the Inca Empire was conquered by the Spaniards in the sixteenth century. It was not until 1911 that the archaeological complex was made known to the outside world.

The approximately 200 structures making up this outstanding religious, ceremonial, astronomical and agricultural centre are set on a steep ridge, crisscrossed by stone terraces. Following a rigorous plan the city is divided into a lower and upper part, separating the farming from residential areas, with a large square between the two. To this day, many of Machu Picchu’s mysteries remain unresolved, including the exact role it may have played in the Incas’ sophisticated understanding of astronomy and domestication of wild plant species.

The massive yet refined architecture of Machu Picchu blends exceptionally well with the stunning natural environment, with which it is intricately linked. Numerous subsidiary centres, an extensive road and trail system, irrigation canals and agricultural terraces bear witness to longstanding, often on-going human use. The rugged topography making some areas difficult to access has resulted in a mosaic of used areas and diverse natural habitats. The Eastern slopes of the tropical Andes with its enormous gradient from high altitude “Puna” grasslands and Polylepis thickets to montane cloud forests all the way down towards the tropical lowland forests are known to harbour a rich biodiversity and high endemism of global significance. Despite its small size the property contributes to conserving a very rich habitat and species diversity with remarkable endemic and relict flora and fauna.

[…]

Tourism itself represents a double-edged sword by providing economic benefits but also by resulting in major cultural and ecological impacts. The strongly increasing number of visitors to the Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu must be matched by an adequate management regulating access, diversifying the offer and efforts to fully understand and minimize impacts. A larger appropriate and increasing share of the significant tourism revenues could be re-invested in planning and management. The planning and organization of transportation and infrastructure construction, as well as the sanitary and safety conditions for both tourists and new residents attracted by tourism requires the creation of high quality and new long-term solutions, and is a significant ongoing concern.

Since the time of inscription consistent concerns have been expressed about ecosystem degradation through logging, firewood and commercial plant collection, poor waste management, poaching, agricultural encroachment in the absence of clear land tenure arrangements, introduced species and water pollution from both urban waste and agro-chemicals in the Urubamba River, in addition from pressures derived from broader development in the region. It is important to remember that the overall risks are aggravated by the location in a high altitude with extreme topography and weather conditions and thus susceptibility to natural disasters. Continuous efforts are needed to comply with protected areas and other legislation and plans and prevent further degradation. There is also great potential for restoring degraded areas.”

All images in this post from the UNESCO website:
(c) Silvan Rehfeld, Geoff Steven, and Ko Hon Chiu Vincent

(Task: If you were offered an all-expenses-paid trip to one (one only!) of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites, which one would you pick (and why)?)

 

Original post:
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24 Festive Tasks: Door 7 – International Day for Tolerance: Task 1

The Wrath and the Dawn - Renee Ahdieh, Ariana Delawari

Task: Find a redeeming quality in a book you read this year and didn’t like.

I’ve never understood the rave reviews that this book is getting, but then, I’m not its target audience; and I suppose if you read it as a straight-up YA fantasy, you might find it OK.  My problem with it consisted in the fact that Ahdieh had actually written it as historical fiction with a few minor fantasy elements — or at least, that’s the way it very much came across to me — without actually having bothered to do the required research, and thus it came up straight against one of my absolute pet peeves.  But if you don’t think historical accuracy and the meaning of the words you are using actually matters, or if you think that YA readers deserve less respect and attention than other readers, I guess you might end up liking this book.

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1994161/24-festive-tasks-door-7-international-day-for-tolerance-task-1

24 Festive Tasks: Door 7 – International Day for Tolerance

17
3 - Melbourne Cup Day
21
9
12
24
22
15
1 - dia de los Muertos
13
18
6 - Veterans / Armistice Day
5 - Bon Om Touk
14
7 - International Day for Tolerance
20
11
23
10
2 - Japanese Culture Day
19
16
8
4 - Guy Fawkes Night
 
International Day for Tolerance
Door 7:  International Day for Tolerance

 
Task 1: Find a redeeming quality in a book you read this year and didn’t like.
 
Task 2: Share a story about yourself, or a story about your family that’s survived the generations, or share a particular tradition your family has passed on from generation to generation and if there’s a story behind why, tell us about it.
 
Task 3: The French expression for tolerance towards others is “laisser faire, laisser aller” (roughly: “let them do as they want, let it go”). Have you ever “let go” a book (e.g., given it away or decided not to yield to the temptation to buy it) and later regretted that choice?
 
Task 4:If you were offered an all-expenses-paid trip to one (one only!) of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites, which one would you pick (and why)?
 
Book: Read a book about tolerance, or outside your comfort zone, or set in Paris (seat of UNESCO).
 

 
NEW: Once you’ve completed a task or tasks, please use the handy form, located in the spoiler tags (to keep things tidy) to let us know. This will make tracking points MUCH easier for the 24 Tasks Team.
[spoiler]
 

* Required
 

Blog Name: *

 
Festive Task Door Completed: *
Choose
Día de los Muertos
Japanese Culture Day
Melbourne Cup Day
Guy Fawkes Night
Bon Om Touk (Korean Water & Moon Festival)
Veterans / Armistice Day
International Day for Tolerance
Winter Solstice (Yule / Yaldā Night / Dongzhi / Soyal)
Hanukkah
Festivus
Christmas
Kwanzaa
New Year’s Eve / St. Sylvester’s Day
Hogswatch
Twelfth Night / Epiphany

 
I’ve completed the following task for this holiday: *
Choose
1
2
3
4
Book
BONUS TASK

 
Have you completed some of the tasks for this holiday already? *
Choose
Yes
No

 
If you have completed tasks previously, which ones? * (Required if answered yes to the previous question.)
Book
T1
T2
T3
T4
BONUS
 
 
(Optional) Link to your blog post:

 
[/spoiler]
 
Previous door’s tasks are “beneath the fold”

 

Previous Doors’ Tasks and Books

 

 
Dia de los Muertos
Door 1:  Día de Los Muertos
 
Task 1: Compose a limerick or short poem in honor of a favorite book character.
 
Task 2:  If you like Mexican food, treat yourself to a favorite dish – and / or make yourself a margarita – and share a photo.
 
Task 3: Write an epitaph for the book you most disliked this year.
 
Task 4: Do you have any traditions or mementos of happy memories of a loved one that you feel like sharing?
 
Book: Reread a favorite book by a deceased author or from a finished series, or read a book set in Mexico or a book that either has a primarily black and white cover or all the colors (ROYGBIV) on the cover, or a book featuring zombies.
 

 

 
Japanese Culture Day
Door 2:  Japanese Culture Day
 
Task 1: Tell us about a cultural festival or event in the area where you live.
 
Task 2: Try a flavor of Kit Kat other than chocolate and report back if you liked it.
 
Task 3: Try your hand at folding a paper crane. Instructions: https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-Paper-Crane-1/
 
Task 4: If you like Japanese food, treat yourself to a favorite dish.
 
Book: Read a graphic novel or a book set in a school or academic setting.
 

 

 
Melbourne Cup Day
Door 3:  Melbourne Cup Day
 
Task 1: Pick your ponies.*
 
Task 2: Roses are the official flower of Flemington Race Track; write your own “Roses are Red, Violets are Blue” poem for one of your favorite or most hated books of all time.
 
Task 3: Aussies shorten everything, so Melbourne Cup Day is just called “Cup Day” – post a picture of your favorite cup or mug for your daily fix of coffee, tea or chocolate.
 
Task 4: Prepare your favorite dessert – in a cup! Post a photo of it for us to enjoy vicariously.
 
Book: Read a book about horses, with a horse or with roses on the cover, about gardening, or set in Australia, or written by an Australian author.
 
* Ponies (horses) running the race will be posted here by Darth Pedant, guest hosting for MurderByDeath, as soon as they’re announced, or thereabouts. The official field is published on November 3rd.

 

 
Guy Fawkes Night
Door 4:  Guy Fawkes Night
 
Task 1: Make a list of the top 3 treasonous crimes against books that an author can commit.
 
Task 2: Start a revolution: What one thing would you change about the book reading world? (Be it publishing, distribution, editing, cover art, bookstores – anything having to do with books.)
 
Task 3: Make a little straw (or wood / cloth / wool / fabric) effigy of the book character you like least.
 
Task 4:

How do you order the books on your shelves?
 
Book: Read a book set in the UK, a political thriller, a book involving any monarchy or revolution, a book about arson or related to fires and burning, a book whose plot involves costumes / fancy dress, or that has masks on the cover, or that is self-published.
 

 

 
Bon Om Touk
Door 5:  Bon Om Touk
 
Task 1: List / tell us about your favorite rainy day reads.
 
Task 2: String up some fairy lights around your books / bookcase / kindle and share a picture of the results.
 
Task 3: Dragons and dragon-like serpents (imugi) are important to Korean mythology (as they are to that of other Asian peoples). So – which are your favorite literary dragons (fictional, mythological, whatever)?
 
Task 4:The South Korean flag features images of ying / yang (the blue and red circle in the center) and four sets of three black lines each representing heaven, sun, moon and earth and, in turn, the virtues humanity, justice, intelligence and courtesy. Compile a list or stack – 4 books minimum – composed of books that either have opposing words in their titles (e.g., war / peace; asleep / awake – not necessarily both words in the same title), or that feature the words “heaven,” “sun,” “moon,” “earth,” “humanity,” “justice,” intelligence,” and / or “courtesy.”
 
Book: Read a book by a Korean author or set in Korea, that takes place at sea or on a river, where the plot involves a festival, where the moon or rain plays a pivotal role in the plot, or with rain, water or the moon on the cover.
 

 

 
Veterans / Armistice Day
Door 6:  Veterans / Armistice Day
 
Task 1: Sunrise services are a staple of this day: Take a picture of the sunrise where you live and share it with us.
 
Task 2: In keeping with the minute of silence, tell us about the authors who have passed this year that you will miss the most.
 
Task 3: Rosemary is for remembrance, but it’s great for chasing away moths, silverfish and other bugs that can damage books (and linens). Make a sachet with some rosemary, lavender, dried basil, etc. to keep on your bookshelves – post a picture of the results and let us know what combinations of herbs you used. A list of possibilities can be found here: https://www.mnn.com/your-home/organic-farming-gardening/stories/12-plants-that-repel-unwanted-insects
 
Task 4:The Forest of Compiègne, just outside Compiègne, France, is the site of the signing of the 1918 Armistice. It was also the site of the signing by the French of a truce with the Germans following the German invasion in 1940. – Find a green space in your local area (or favorite area) and go for a walk or bike ride of a mile (or 1.61 km) and post a picture or screenshot of the map of where you walked / biked.
 
Book: Read a book involving a war, battle, or where characters are active military or veterans, or with poppies on the cover, or honor the ‘unknown soldier’ of your TBR and read the book that’s been there the longest.
 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1982190/24-festive-tasks-door-7-international-day-for-tolerance

A Very French Christmas

24 Festive Tasks: Door 6 – International Day for Tolerance, Book


An anthology of French Christmas short stories, from 19th century classics to contemporary, up to and including stories published in 2017.  “Nobody does Christmas like the French” is, of course, monumental sales hyperbole (and that’s not even taking into account the ubiquitous non-French usual suspects like Dickens’s Christmas Carol and E.T.A. Hoffmann’s Nutcracker), but the stories included are enjoyable enough, even if (on balance) a bit on the preachy side.

Since several of these stories are set in Paris, I’m using this as my book for the 24 Festive Tasks – International Day for Tolerance square.  Since one of the anthologized stories is by Irène Némirovsky, I’m also using it for the “N” square of the Women Writers Bingo.

 

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1817925/24-festive-tasks-door-6-international-day-for-tolerance-book

John Bude: The Lake District Murder — Book Redemption

24 Festive Tasks: Door 6 – International Day for Tolerance, Task 1

Looking back through my “read” shelf, one of the books I liked least this year was John Bude’s Lake District Murder.  I felt the book missed a monumental opportunity in not exploiting the dramatic setting of the Lake District where the action takes place, and I was also rather annoyed by the fact that the investigation into the murder discovered at the beginning of the book is sidetracked not once but twice — admittedly into ultimately related crimes, but by God, the two investigative strains should have been much more intertwined.

That said, any reader adverse to last-minute surprise revelations and preferring to remain on an equal footing with the book’s detectives will have absolutely no reason to complain here: Bude (like Freeman Wills Crofts) subscribed to the notion of “playing fair with the reader,” so any and all clues uncovered by the police are laid out the moment they are uncovered (and in excrutiating detail).  For me, the resulting conclusions were altogether a bit too obvious … but if this is your jam — and it has to be admitted that “playing fair with the reader” was a maxim to which all members of the Detection Club subscribed (even though they implemented it in vastly differing ways) — then maybe you should give Bude’s writing a try.

Original review HERE.

 

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1810010/24-festive-tasks-door-6-international-day-for-tolerance-task-1-book-redemption

24 Festive Tasks: Door 6 – International Day for Tolerance

Space

Guy Fawks Night

veteran's and armistace day

Diwali

dio de los meurtos

International Day of Tolerance

Melbourne Cup Day

 

The International Day for Tolerance — observed on November 16 — is an annual holiday intended to generate public awareness of the dangers of intolerance. It was declared by UNESCO in 1995, the UN’s fiftieth anniversary year, which in turn was declared the United Nations Year for Tolerance. Every year since then, on November 16, various conferences and festivals are organized to mark the International Day for Tolerance; among them, the Universal Tolerance Cartoon Festival in Drammen, Norway, which organized an International Cartoon Festival in 2013. — The winner of the biannual UNESCO-Madanjeet Singh Prize for the promotion of tolerance and non-violence, established in 1996 in connection with the 125th anniversary of the birth of Mahatma Gandhi, is also announced on the International Day for Tolerance. The US $100,000 award is given to individuals and institutions standing out for their exceptional contributions and leadership in the field of tolerance promotion, or to the families of outstanding individuals who have lost their lives in the struggle against intolerance. Past laureates include Myanmar politician and activist Aung San Suu Kyi (2002) and Bangladeshi-Swedish author and human rights activist Taslima Nasrin (2004).

 

Tasks and Books

International Day of Tolerance

Task 1:  Find some redeeming quality in the book you liked least this year and post about it.

 

Task 2: Tell us: What are the tropes (up to 5) that you are not willing to live with in any book (i.e., which are absolutely beyond your capacity for tolerance) and which make that book an automatic DNF for you? (Insta-love? Love triangles? First person present narrative voice? Talking animals? The dog dies? What else?)

 

Task 3: The International Day for Tolerance is a holiday declared by an international organization (UNESCO). Create a charter (humorous, serious, whatever strikes your fancy) for an international organization of readers.

 

Task 4: UNESCO is based in Paris. Paris is known for its pastries and its breads: Either find a baker that specializes in pastries and bring home an assortment for your family, or make your own pastries using real butter and share a photo with us.

 

Book:  Read any fiction/non-fiction about tolerance or a book that’s outside your normal comfort zone.  (Tolerance can encompass anything you generally struggle with, be it sentient or not.) OR Read a book set in Paris.

 
(Click “Read More” for the previous days’ tasks and books.)
 


 

Previous Doors’ Tasks and Books

 

Armistice/Veterans' Day

Door 5:  Veterans’ / Armistice Day

 

Task 1:  Using book covers (real or virtual), create a close approximation of your country’s flag (either of residence or birth), OR a close approximation of a poppy.  Take a pic of your efforts and post.

 

Task 2: Make an offer of peace (letter, gift, whatever) to a book character who has particularly annoyed you this year.

 

Task 3: Tell us: What author’s books would you consider yourself a veteran of (i.e., by which author have you read particularly many books – or maybe even all of them)?

 

Task 4: Treat yourself to a slice of poppy seedcake and post a photo. If you want to make it yourself, try out this recipe: https://tastesbetterfromscratch.com/poppy-seed-cake/ … or this one: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1629633/lemon-and-poppy-seed-cake

 

Book:  Read any book involving wars, battles, where characters are active military or veterans, or with poppies on the cover.

 

Diwali
Door 4:  Diwali
 
Task 1: Share a picture of your favorite light display.
 
Task 2: Cleaning is a big part of this holiday; choose one of your shelves, real or virtual, and tidy / organise it.  Give us the before and after photos.  OR Tidy up 5 of the books on your BookLikes shelves by adding the CORRECT cover, and/or any other missing information. (If in doubt, see here: http://jenn.booklikes.com/post/1782687/state-of-the-database-booklikes-database-halloween-bingo-and-a-mini-rant-with-pictures).
 
Task 3: Eating sweets is also a big part of Diwali. Either select a recipe for a traditional sweet, or make a family favorite and share a picture with us.
 
Task 4: During Diwali, people pray to the goddess Lakhshmi, who is typically depicted as a beautiful young woman holding a lotus flower. Find 5 books on your shelves (either physical or virtual) whose covers show a young woman holding a flower and share their cover images.
 
Book: Read a book with candles on the cover or the word “candle” or “light” in the title; OR a book that is the latest in a series; OR set in India; OR any non-fiction book that is ‘illuminating’ (Diwali is Sanskrit for light/knowledge and row, line or series)

 

Melbourne Cup Day
Door 3:  Melbourne Cup Day
 
Task 1: Pick your ponies!  MbD has posted the horses scheduled to race; everyone picks the three they think will finish (in any order).  
 
Task 2:  Cup day is all about the hats.  Post a picture of your favorite hat, whether it’s one you own or not.
 
Task 3: The coloring of the “horse of a different color” in the movie version of The Wizard of Oz was created by rubbing the horse’s fur with jello. What’s the weirdest use of jello you’ve ever come across?
 
Task 4: Have you ever been to or participated in a competition involving horses (racing, jumping, dressage, whatever)? Tell us about it. Photos welcome, too!
 
Book: about horses or a horse on the cover.  Books with roses on the cover or about gardening; anything set in Australia.

 

 
Guy Fawkes Night
Door 2:  Guy Fawkes Night
 
Task 1: Burn a book in effigy.  Not that anyone of us would do such a thing, but if you HAD to, which book would be the one you’d sacrifice to the flames (gleefully or not)?
 
Task 2: List your top 3 treasonous crimes against books.  Not ones you’ve committed, but the ones you think are the worst.
 
Task 3: Share your favorite / most memorable BBQ recollections or recipe, or your favorite recipe of food “flambé” (i.e., doused with alcohol which is then set aflame and allowed to burn off).
 
Task 4: Find 5 uses of the word “gunpowder” in book titles in contexts other than for blowing up things or shooting people (e.g., Gunpowder Green by Laura Childs = tea).
 
Book:  Set in the UK, political thrillers, involving any monarchy or revolution; books about arson or related to burning.

 

 
Dia de los Muertos

Door 1:  Día de Los Muertos

 

Task 1: Write a silly poem or limerick poking fun at the fiction character of your choice.

 

Task 2: Share your favorite gravestone epitaph (you know you have one).

 

Task 3: Create an altar (either digital or physical) for your favorite book, series, or book character, and post a picture of it.  Inclusion of book cover encouraged.

 

Task 4: If you like Mexican food, treat yourself to your favorite dish and share a photo of it.

 

Book: Re-read an old favorite from a now-deceased author, a book from a finished (dead) series, or a book set in Mexico.

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1807219/24-festive-tasks-door-6-international-day-for-tolerance