Halloween Bingo 2019: Tracking Post — Blackout! (And bingos Nos. 12 and 13.)

 

Many thanks to Moonlight Reader and Obsidian Blue for hosting this game for the fourth year in a row, bigger and better than ever before!

Witih today’s call, I’ve blacked out my card, in addition to collecting my final bingos (nos. 12 and 13).

Somewhat to my surprise, after completing my books for my official bingo card at the end of September, I even managed to read enough extra books to put together a supplemental inofficial card throughout the month of October, so this year’s game has really exceeded my wildest expectations in every conceivable way!

 

My Official 2019 Bingo Card:

Weekly Status Updates and Reviews:

First Week
Second Week
Third Week
Fourth Week

 

The Books:

International Woman of Mystery: Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale and The Testaments – finished September 29, 2019.
Locked Room Mystery: Clayton Rawson: Death from a Top Hat – finished September 23, 2019.
Murder Most Foul: Michael Gilbert: Smallbone Deceased – finished September 13, 2019.
Psych: Sofi Oksanen: Fegefeuer (The Purge) – finished September 17, 2019.
Read by Flashlight or Candle Light: The Lady Detectives: Four BBC Radio 4 Crime Dramatisations – finished September 20, 2019.

DeadLands: Terry Pratchett: Monstrous Regiment – finished September 26, 2019.
Fear the Drowning Deep: Delia Owens: Where the Crawdads Sing – finished September 25, 2019.
Relics and Curiosities: Patricia Wentworth: Eternity Ring – finished September 10, 2019.
Dark Academia: James Hilton: Was It Murder? – finished September 1, 2019.
Modern Noir: Joy Ellis: The Guilty Ones – finished September 21, 2019.

Ghost Stories: Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten – finished September 1, 2019.
Gothic: Peter Ackroyd: Hawksmoor – finished September 9, 2019.
Free (Raven) Space: Agatha Christie: The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories – finished September 7, 2019.
Truly Terrifying: Bob Berman: Earth-Shattering – finished September 12, 2019.
Amateur Sleuth: Priscilla Royal: Wine of Violence – finished September 5, 2019.

Cryptozoologist: Terry Pratchett: Guards! Guards! – finished September 18, 2019.
Diverse Voices: Toni Morrison: Beloved – finished September 22, 2019.
Black Cat: Jim Butcher: The Aeronaut’s Windlass – finished September 16, 2019.
Creepy Crawlies: Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Gods of Jade and Shadow – finished September 7, 2019.
Country House Mystery: Anthony Rolls: Scarweather – finished September 14, 2019.

Spellbound: Zen Cho: Sorcerer to the Crown – finished September 6, 2019.
A Grimm Tale: Ellen Datlow & Terry Windling (eds.): The Wolf at the Door and Other Retold Fairy Tales – finished September 4, 2019.
Creepy Carnivals: Fredric Brown: The Dead Ringer – finished September 12, 2019.
Paint It Black: Trudi Canavan: The Magicians’ Guild – finished September 20, 2019.
Cozy Mysteries: Margery Allingham: The White Cottage Mystery – finished September 19, 2019.

 

My Square Markers

 

Called but not read

Read but not called

Read and Called

Center Square: Read and Called

 

The Extra Squares / Card and Books:

13: Rex Stout: And Be a Villain
Supernatural: Jennifer Estep: Kill the Queen
New Release: Sara Collins: The Confessions of Frannie Langton
Genre: Mystery: Catherine Louisa Pirkis: The Experiences of Loveday Brooke, Lady Detective
Romantic Suspense: Georgette Heyer: The Unfinished Clue
Terror in a Small Town: Ann Cleeves: Raven Black
Halloween: Agatha Christie: Hallowe’en Party
Monsters: Terry Pratchett: Pyramids
Shifters: Joan D. Vinge: Ladyhawke
Sleepy Hollow: Dennis Lehane: The Given Day
Film at 11: J.B. Priestley: An Inspector Calls
In the Dark, Dark Woods: Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness
Free (Raven) Square: Various Authors: The Rivals: Tales of Sherlock Holmes’ Rival Detectives
Grave or Graveyard: Kathy Reichs: Grave Secrets
Genre: Suspense: Tony Medawar (ed.) & Various Authors: Bodies from the Library 2
Southern Gothic: Sharyn McCrumb: The Unquiet Grave
Baker Street Irregulars: Joanne Harris: Gentlemen & Players
Darkest London: J.V. Turner: Below the Clock
Magical Realism: Joanne Harris: Chocolat
It was a dark and stormy night: Peter May: The Lewis Man
Full Moon: Edmund Crispin: Glimpses of the Moon
King of Fear: John Le Carré: Absolute Friends
Serial / Spree Killer: Steven Kramer, Paul Holes & Jim Clemente: Evil Has a Name
Classic Noir: Patricia Highsmith: Strangers on a Train
Classic Horror: Matthew G. Lewis: The Monk

Note: With regard to the extra squares, I added the image for the relevant square for every book completed (= “read”); and I am using my “called” markers for the main card to indicate “called and read”.

 

My Spreadsheet:

My Book Preselections Post: HERE

 

My Transfiguration Spells

Not used.

 

My “Virgin” Bingo Card:

Posted for ease of tracking and comparison.

 

 

Original post:
http://themisathena.booklikes.com/post/1942220/halloween-bingo-2019-tracking-post

Bingo call: 9/29/19 – Truly Terrifying

Reblogged from: Moonlight Murder

 

Non-fiction that has elements of suspense, horror or mystery, including true crime, both contemporary and historical. Examples would be The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher by Kate Summerscale, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, or The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson. If you have another idea, run it by me – just remember that it has to fit into the general Halloween Bingo criteria of mystery, suspense, horror or supernatural!

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1960156/bingo-call-9-29-19

Halloween Bingo 2019: Tracking Post — Bingo No. 3 and Reading Blackout

* Triple Bingo Happy Dance *

Well, that went by much faster than I had anticipated … Many thanks to Moonlight Reader and Obsidian Blue for hosting this game for the fourth year in a row, bigger and better than ever before!

I’ll continue tracking my bingos of course — and since we now have so many more great squares than can possibly fit on one person’s card, I’ll just continue reading for a few of the extra squares that didn’t make it onto mine.

And I hope everybody else is going to continue / start collecting bingos soon as well!

 

Weekly Status Updates and Reviews:

First Week
Second Week
Third Week

 

The Books:

International Woman of Mystery: Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale and The Testaments – finished September 29, 2019.
Locked Room Mystery: Clayton Rawson: Death from a Top Hat – finished September 23, 2019.
Murder Most Foul: Michael Gilbert: Smallbone Deceased – finished September 13, 2019.
Psych: Sofi Oksanen: Fegefeuer (The Purge) – finished September 17, 2019.
Read by Flashlight or Candle Light: The Lady Detectives: Four BBC Radio 4 Crime Dramatisations – finished September 20, 2019.

DeadLands: Terry Pratchett: Monstrous Regiment – finished September 26, 2019.
Fear the Drowning Deep: Delia Owens: Where the Crawdads Sing – finished September 25, 2019.
Relics and Curiosities: Patricia Wentworth: Eternity Ring – finished September 10, 2019.
Dark Academia: James Hilton: Was It Murder? – finished September 1, 2019.
Modern Noir: Joy Ellis: The Guilty Ones – finished September 21, 2019.

Ghost Stories: Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten – finished September 1, 2019.
Gothic: Peter Ackroyd: Hawksmoor – finished September 9, 2019.
Free (Raven) Space: Agatha Christie: The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories – finished September 7, 2019.
Truly Terrifying: Bob Berman: Earth-Shattering – finished September 12, 2019.
Amateur Sleuth: Priscilla Royal: Wine of Violence – finished September 5, 2019.

Cryptozoologist: Terry Pratchett: Guards! Guards! – finished September 18, 2019.
Diverse Voices: Toni Morrison: Beloved – finished September 22, 2019.
Black Cat: Jim Butcher: The Aeronaut’s Windlass – finished September 16, 2019.
Creepy Crawlies: Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Gods of Jade and Shadow – finished September 7, 2019.
Country House Mystery: Anthony Rolls: Scarweather – finished September 14, 2019.

Spellbound: Zen Cho: Sorcerer to the Crown – finished September 6, 2019.
A Grimm Tale: Ellen Datlow & Terry Windling (eds.): The Wolf at the Door and Other Retold Fairy Tales – finished September 4, 2019.
Creepy Carnivals: Fredric Brown: The Dead Ringer – finished September 12, 2019.
Paint It Black: Trudi Canavan: The Magicians’ Guild – finished September 20, 2019.
Cozy Mysteries: Margery Allingham: The White Cottage Mystery – finished September 19, 2019.

 

My Square Markers

 

Called but not read

Read but not called

Read and Called

Center Square: Read and Called

 

My Spreadsheet:

My Book Preselections Post: HERE

 

My Transfiguration Spells

Not used.

 

My “Virgin” Bingo Card:

Posted for ease of tracking and comparison.

 

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1942220/halloween-bingo-2019-tracking-post-bingo-no-3-and-reading-blackout

Diarmaid MacCulloch: Thomas Cromwell

Masterly.

Thomas Cromwell: A Life - Diarmaid MacCulloch

Simply put, the Cromwell biography to end all Cromwell biographies.  In his research for this book, MacCulloch took a fresh look at virtually every single document on which Cromwell’s vast legacy is based, and the resulting biography is a masterpiece of historical analysis which does away with many an often-repeated myth (beginning right at the beginning of Cromwell’s life, with the role of his father), and which shines a light on Cromwell’s many innovations and achievements and on the inner workings of his meteoric rise from humble tradesman’s son to Henry VIII’s chief minister.  In the process, MacCulloch reevaluates everything from the foreign merchant experience that Cromwell gained early in life, to his work as Cardinal Wolsey’s assistant and, finally, his growing preeminence and his seminal policy as the power behind Henry VIII’s throne.  What emerges from MacCulloch’s analysis is the picture of a highly complex and intelligent man, difficult to deal with even for friends, fierce and ruthless as an enemy — but always with England’s well-being and advancement (as well as the advancement of its institutions) at his heart; the one man who, in the space of a single short decade, emerged as the single most important politician of the entire Tudor Age (short of, just possibly, Elizabeth I), whose legacy (and the legacy of his innovations and reforms, far above and beyond the well-known Acts of Parliament which he initiated) reaches down the centuries all the way to the present date.

If you even have the slightest interest in Tudor history and politics, run, don’t walk to get this book.  And for a special treat, also get the audio version narrated by David Rintoul.  This is an intense, fact-packed read and (in either the print or audio version) not a book to rush through; but it is SO worth taking the time.  What a fascinating personality — and what an amazing biography.

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1939169/masterly

Tom Reiss: The Black Count

The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo - Tom Reiss

This is a highly fascinating biography: We’ve come to think of Alexandre Dumas père and fils as the two writers, but did you know that Dumas père’s father (also called Alexandre) — the son of a black Haitian slave and a French count — was a general in the French revolutionary army and, in his own time, much more important than his son and grandson ever were in theirs?  Reiss’s book not only tells the story of his life; it also places General Dumas’s life into the wider context of his era and examines, inter alia, how equal the budding colonial power’s black sons and daughters actually were in the motherland of “Liberté – Egalité – Fraternité” (spoiler: they weren’t).  The picture emerging from Reiss’s research is that of a man of great personal courage, intelligence and ambition, as well as sheer enormous physical presence, whose life was cut tragically short as a result of the side effects of being caught up in the European and French power struggle of his time — and in case you ever had any doubts, yes, General Dumas was the model for one of his son’s greatest heroes, the Count of Monte Cristo … and D’Artagnan’s famous friendship-building duel with all three Musqueteers at the beginning of their acquaintance does have a basis in reality as well.  — In sum, a great biography of an extraordinary man; highly recommended!

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1937255/reading-progress-update-i-ve-read-100

Banine: Days in the Caucasus


Well, looks like I was tempting fate after all.  As it turns out, not every memoir set in the former USSR in the years before and during the Russian Revolution was really shouting out to be written.  This is definitely one such — which is particularly disappointing as the writer’s father was a leading Azerbaijani (oil) industrialist and a minister in the short-lived 1918-19 Azerbaijan Democratic Republic.  I realize that Banine was a child during the years that she describes in this book (up to her emigration to Paris in 1923 at age 18), but she was an adult woman when she sat down to write it some 20 years later, and for her memoir nevertheless to contain no more than an extremely superficial description of the political circumstances of the day, absolutely zero analysis (political or otherwise), and instead a relation solely from the perspective of her spoiled child-self of those years is pretty underwhelming.  This could have been so much more.

As a side note, Anoushka Rava is going straight onto my list of “never again” narrators.  Note to publisher: A narrator with no ears for narrative rhythm, flow and texture does decidedly not add to the authenticity of the narration, for however much their accent may (presumably) resemble that of the author when speaking a foreign language.  It is also emphatically not necessary to spend nine hours yelling at the reader / listener in order to convey the impression of a household in which conversations conducted at that level of vocal exertion (equally exercised by all speakers, and moreover at the same time) was apparently the norm.

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1933553/reading-progress-update-i-ve-read-100

All 61 squares revealed: 1 through 18 (New Squares & Horror)

Reblogged from: Moonlight Reader

 

All of the new squares (and scares) have been revealed, and I got these posts put together over the past few days, so I’m ready to reveal ALL OF THE SQUARES!

Buckle up, butter cup.

A note on book lists: where we have already got a working book list, I’ve linked to it. However, word of clarification: the rules have changed a bit in the last 3 years – so not every book on the booklists is necessarily a horror, supernatural, mystery or suspense book. If it shows up on a booklist it has been approved for game play on that space and is “grandfathered in” to eligibility.

The new categories don’t have a book list associated with them yet.

I am going to do this in three posts, because they are going to be very long! You’ve seen the 9 new squares:

  

1. Dark Academia: Any mystery, suspense, supernatural or horror that takes place at a school – high school, college, boarding school, etc.

2. Dystopian Hellscape: This is a multi-genre square! Any book that relates to the fictional depiction of a dystopian society, such as The Handmaid’s Tale or The Hunger Games, would qualify!

3. International Woman of Mystery: This one is fairly obvious and is a twist on the “Terrifying Women” of years past – the only question is what does “international” mean? Basically, it means international to you – the reader. I’m in the U.S., so “international” means women mystery authors from Europe, South America, Asia, etc…

  

4. Psych: Psychological thrillers, plot twists and suspense, unreliable narrators and other mind-fuckery. And, as an aside, any Halloween Bingo book that takes place within or related to an insane asylum, haunted or otherwise, would qualify!

5. Truly Terrifying: Non-fiction that has elements of suspense, horror or mystery, including true crime, both contemporary and historical. Examples would be The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher by Kate Summerscale, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, or The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson. If you have another idea, run it by me – just remember that it has to fit into the general Halloween Bingo criteria of mystery, suspense, horror or supernatural!

6. Paint It Black: Any book with a cover that is primarily black or has the word black in the title, was written by a black author, or relates to rock and roll music.

  

7. Stranger Things: this is a twist on the past 80’s Horror square with elements of the television show  – any horror that has supernatural elements, portal/parallel universes, government plots gone awry or is set or was written in the 1980’s.

8. Film at 11:  The idea for this new space comes courtesy of Linda Hilton! Generally, in order to qualify for Halloween bingo, all books must fit into one of the general genres of horror, mystery, suspense or supernatural. This space is filled by any Halloween bingo book that has been adapted to film or television. For extra fun, you can watch the adaptation – although this is an optional add on!

9. King of Fear: You can read anything written by Stephen King or Joe Hill, or recommended by Stephen King (as long as the recommendation is otherwise eligible for Halloween Bingo).

 

The “horror” squares:

  

10. Genre: Horror: Anything that qualifies as horror. Book list linked here.

11. Southern Gothic: horror set in the Southern part of the United States; Book list linked here.

12. Modern Masters of Horror: horror published in or after 2000. See horror booklist – notes identify sub-categories.

  

13. Fear Street: 1980’s and 1990’s vintage pulp-style series horror, targeted to teens, such as Point Horror, Fear Street and horror fiction that is written/published primarily for a YA or MG audience. Examples would include The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey. Book list linked here.

14. Terror in a Small Town: any horror book where the action primarily occurs in a small town or village. Examples would include: Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury, It by Stephen King. Book list linked here.

15. Slasher Stories: books that share the tropes of classic slasher movies: teen characters, indestructible killers and/or multiple victims. Book list linked here.

  

16. Classic Horror: horror fiction that was published prior to 1980; Book list linked here.

17. American Horror Story: horror set in the United States. See horror booklist – notes identify sub-categories.

19. Stone Cold Horror: this is a late addition because I had too much YA horror, so I combined a couple of categories into Fear Street & needed something else for the horror genre! Horror that takes place primarily in a winter/cold/snow type setting.

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1933537/all-61-squares-revealed-1-through-18

New Space #4: Truly Terrifying

Reblogged from: Moonlight Reader

 

You get two new spaces today – I’ve been having chromebook issues at home over the weekend!

 

 

Non-fiction that has elements of suspense, horror or mystery, including true crime, both contemporary and historical. Examples would be The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher by Kate Summerscale, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, or The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson. If you have another idea, run it by me – just remember that it has to fit into the general Halloween Bingo criteria of mystery, suspense, horror or supernatural!

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1930794/new-space-4

Halloween Bingo 2019 PreParty — Question for 08/02 (Day 2): Vampires, Werewolves, Zombies or Other?

Witches.

One of my very first literary heroine was a little witch who manages to get the better of all the bigger, older witches after having been put down by them — the heroine of Otfried Preußler’s Little Witch.  (In fact, I loved that book enough to write my very first fan letter to the author about it … and I still love it enough to have put it on MR’s “1001” list.)

Ever since, I’ve come to be interested in them because women are almost always maligned as “witches” when people are afraid of them because they — the women in question — happen to be better at something (or are merely perceived as being better at something) than others.  That’s true for the poor ladies of centuries past who just happened to know their herbs a bit better than their neighbors, potentially even better than the local monastery’s herbalist, and who, after having helped countless community members with every ailment from headaches to abortion, were duly burned at the stake for their troubles the second they even inadvertently stepped on someone’s toes.   And it’s still true for women who happen to be better at their jobs nowadays than their (mostly, but not necessarily male) colleagues.  Other slurs plainly denigrate — “witch” (and to a certain extent also “bitch”) implies an irrational element of fear.  In light of that, the transformation of witches — or their perception — from the worst of evil bogey(wo)men conceivable to a positive identification with the “women’s power” movement is a thing to behold; not least in literature.

Which, incidentally, is just one more reason why I love Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens.   And along the same lines, who wouldn’t love Mr. Pratchett’s Granny Weatherwax and her coven?

Though, speaking of Pratchett, he has also created just about the only werewolf I can get behind (and for similar reasons) — Angua of the Night Watch.

And, well, yeah, in terms of stories that were films before they were books, Ladyhawke of course … which isn’t so much a horror as a “doomed lovers” story, obviously.

Vampires, though?  Hmm.  I mean, on the one hand, give me Dracula rather than Edward Cullen any day of the week (and I’m saying that as a confirmed non-horror reader).  On the other hand, I read Anne Rice’s vampire novels — until she turned BBA, that is — for just about everything but the horror aspect; in fact, if she’d ramped up that one I’d have been gone in a flash.  (Incidentally, Rice once revealed in an interview that Lestat’s character was inspired by Rutger Hauer’s portrayal of Etienne de Navarre in Ladyhawke.  Go figure.)

 

And zombies?  Leave me alone and get the hell out of here.  They creep me out so badly I won’t even go anywhere near them in a supposedly humorous context (like the “white trash zombie” novels that are currently all the rage).

 

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1929432/halloween-bingo-2019-preparty-question-for-08-02-day-2-vampires-werewolves-zombies-or-other

Crowdsourced History Reading — Supplemental List

Off my shelves as listed there and without regard to topical overlaps etc.:

WOMEN

Freya Stark: The Valleys of the Assassins and Other Persian Travels
Freya Stark: Perseus in the Wind: A Life of Travel
Stacy Schiff: Cleopatra
Kara Cooney: When Women Ruled the World: Six Queens of Egypt
Elizabeth Norton: Elfrida: The First Crowned Queen of England
Elizabeth Norton: The Lives of Tudor Women
Linda Porter: The First Queen of England: The Myth of “Bloody Mary”
Sarah Gristwood: Blood Sisters: The Women Behind the Wars of the Roses
Henrietta Leyser: Medieval Women: A Social History of Women in England 450-1500
Anna Maria Sigmund: Women of the Third Reich
Fatima Mernissi: Forgotten Queens of Islam
Simone de Beauvoir: Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter
Margery Kempe: The Book of Margery Kempe
Anton Gill: Art Lover: A Biography of Peggy Guggenheim
Sarah B. Pomeroy: Goddesses, Whores, Wives and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity
Giles Tremlett: Isabella of Castile: Europe’s First Great Queen
Julia Fox: Sister Queens: Katherine of Aragon and Juana Queen of Castile
Jenny Uglow: Elizabeth Gaskell: A Habit of Stories
Jenny Uglow: George Eliot
Madeleine Albright: Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War, 1937-1948
Marjorie Chibnall: The Empress Matilda: Queen Consort, Queen Mother and Lady of the English
Elizabeth Wayland Barber: Women’s Work: The First 20,000 Years – Women, Cloth, and Society in Early Times
Anne-Marie-Louise d’Orléans Montpensier: Against Marriage: The Correspondence of La Grande Mademoiselle
John Guy: A Daughter’s Love: Thomas and Margaret More
Mary Wortley Montagu: Selected Letters

 

WORLD

Jonathan D. Spence: Mao Zedong: A Life
Kim DePaul, Dith Pran: Children of Cambodia’s Killing Fields: Memoirs by Survivors
Peter Scholl-Latour: Der Tod im Reisfeld (Death in the Rice Fields)
Vasily Grossman: An Armenian Sketchbook
Banine: Days in the Caucasus
Robert K. Massie: Peter the Great: His Life and World
Rebecca West: Black Lamb and Grey Falcon
William L. Shirer: Berlin Diary: The Journal of a Foreign Correspondent 1934-41
Jacob Burckhardt: The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy
Chris Lowney: A Vanished World: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Spain
Paul Preston: The Spanish Civil War: Reaction, Revolution and Revenge
Tom Reiss: The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal and the Real Count of Monte Cristo
Alan Moorehead: The White Nile
Giles Milton: Nathaniel’s Nutmeg: How One Man’s Courage Changed the Course of History
Gerard Prunier: Africa’s World War: Congo, the Rwandan Genocide, and the Making of a Continental Catastrophe
Roald Amundsen: Race to the South Pole
Robert Falcon Scott: Journals
Albert Schweitzer: Out of My Life and Thought
Ezekiel Mphahlele: Down Second Avenue
Anthony Sattin: The Gates Of Africa: Death, Discovery And The Search For Timbuktu
Bruce Chatwin: Songlines
Bruce Chatwin: In Patagonia
Inge Scholl: Die weiße Rose (The White Rose)
Alan Booth: Looking for the Lost: Journeys Through a Vanishing Japan
Solomon Volkov: St Petersburg: A Cultural History
Sun Shuyun: The Long March: The True History of Communist China’s Founding Myth
Der Ling: Two Years in the Forbidden City
Nancy Marie Brown: The Abacus and the Cross: The Story of the Pope Who Brought the Light of Science to the Dark Ages
Judith Armatta: Twilight of Impunity: The War Crimes Trial of Slobodan Milosevic
Roger Crowley: Conquerors: How Portugal Forged the First Global Impire
Roger Crowley: City of Fortune: How Venice Won and Lost a Naval Empire
Roger Crowley: The Accursed Tower: The Fall of Acre and the End of the Crusades
Barbara W. Tuchman: A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous Fourteenth Century
Barbara W. Tuchman: The March of Folly: From Troy to Vietnam
William Raymond Manchester: A World Lit Only by Fire
Katharine Sim: Desert Traveller: The Life of Jean Louis Burckhardt
Jacob D’Ancona: The City of Light: The Hidden Journal of the Man Who Entered China Four Years Before Marco Polo
Marco Polo: The Travels
Niall Ferguson: The House of Rothschild (2 parts)
Timothy Snyder: On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century
Hannah Arendt: The Origins of Totalitarianism

 

ANCIENT

Donald Kagan: The Peloponnesian War: Athens and Sparta in Savage Conflict, 431-404 BC
Donald Kagan: Pericles Of Athens And The Birth Of Democracy
Donald Kagan: The Fall of the Athenian Empire
Tacitus: Annals & Histories
Barry S. Strauss: The Spartacus War
Edward Gibbon: The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

 

U.S.

Shirley Jackson: The Witchcraft of Salem Village
Doris Kearns Goodwin: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
John Kenneth Galbraith: The Great Crash, 1929
Meriwether Lewis, William Clark: Journals
Bernard Bailyn: The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution
Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War
Ron Stallworth: Black Klansman
Robert F. Kennedy: Thirteen Days: A Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis
John F. Kennedy: Profiles in Courage
Michael Lienesch: In the Beginning: Fundamentalism, the Scopes Trial, and the Making of the Antievolution Movement
Sojourner Truth: Narrative of Sojourner Truth
Carl Sandburg: Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years and The War Years (2 parts)
Various Authors: Remembering Jim Crow: African Americans Tell About Life in the Segregated South
Various Authors / Library of America: Reporting Civil Rights
James F. Simon: What Kind of Nation: Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, and the Epic Struggle to Create a United States
Christopher Corbett: Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of the Pony Express

 

ENGLAND & IRELAND

Desmond Seward: Last White Rose: The Secret Wars of the Tudors
Jenny Uglow: A Gambling Man: Charles II and the Restoration
Sarah Foot: Aethelstan: The First King of England
Jim Bradbury: Stephen and Matilda: The Civil War of 1139-53
Richard White: King Arthur in Legend and History
James Lydon: The Making of Ireland: From Ancient Times to the Present

 

LITERATURE / SCIENCE / ARTS / PHILOSOPHY / CULTURE

Edmund Morris: Beethoven: The Universal Composer
Jim Al-Khalili: The House of Wisdom: How Arabic Science Saved Ancient Knowledge and Gave Us the Renaissance
Mark Pendergrast: Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How It Transformed Our World
Ralph S. Hattox: Coffee and Coffeehouses: The Origins of a Social Beverage in the Medieval Near East
Charles Darwin: The Voyage of the Beagle
Andrew Hodges: Alan Turing: The Enigma
Langston Hughes, Carl Van Vechten: Remember Me to Harlem: The Letters of Langston Hughes and Carl Van Vechten
Sarah Bakewell: At The Existentialist Café
Agatha Christie, Mathew Prichard: The Grand Tour: Letters and Photographs from the British Empire Expedition 1922
James Boswell: The Life of Samuel Johnson
Lisa Jardine: Ingenious Pursuits: Building the Scientific Revolution
Various Authors: Seeing Further: The Story of Science, Discovery, and the Genius of the Royal Society
Richard Holmes: The Age of Wonder
Elizabeth Ward, Alain Silver: Raymond Chandler’s Los Angeles
Simon Callow: Charles Dickens
Jackson J. Benson: Wallace Stegner
Jackson J. Benson: John Steinbeck
Ross King: Michelangelo and the Pope’s Ceiling
Walter Isaacson: Einstein: His Life And Universe
Charles Nicholl: Leonardo da Vinci: Flights of the Mind
Marilyn Yalom: Birth of the Chess Queen: A History
John Stubbs: Donne: The Reformed Soul
Sharon Bertsch McGrayne: Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries
Eve Curie: Madame Curie: A Biography
Erika Mann: Mein Vater, der Zauberer
Jesse Owens: Jesse: The Man Who Outran Hitler

@Chris: I’m going to add these now.

 

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1927418/crowdsourced-history-reading-supplemental-list