Halloween Bingo 2019: Tracking Post — Blackout! (And bingos Nos. 12 and 13.)

 

Many thanks to Moonlight Reader and Obsidian Blue for hosting this game for the fourth year in a row, bigger and better than ever before!

Witih today’s call, I’ve blacked out my card, in addition to collecting my final bingos (nos. 12 and 13).

Somewhat to my surprise, after completing my books for my official bingo card at the end of September, I even managed to read enough extra books to put together a supplemental inofficial card throughout the month of October, so this year’s game has really exceeded my wildest expectations in every conceivable way!

 

My Official 2019 Bingo Card:

Weekly Status Updates and Reviews:

First Week
Second Week
Third Week
Fourth Week

 

The Books:

International Woman of Mystery: Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale and The Testaments – finished September 29, 2019.
Locked Room Mystery: Clayton Rawson: Death from a Top Hat – finished September 23, 2019.
Murder Most Foul: Michael Gilbert: Smallbone Deceased – finished September 13, 2019.
Psych: Sofi Oksanen: Fegefeuer (The Purge) – finished September 17, 2019.
Read by Flashlight or Candle Light: The Lady Detectives: Four BBC Radio 4 Crime Dramatisations – finished September 20, 2019.

DeadLands: Terry Pratchett: Monstrous Regiment – finished September 26, 2019.
Fear the Drowning Deep: Delia Owens: Where the Crawdads Sing – finished September 25, 2019.
Relics and Curiosities: Patricia Wentworth: Eternity Ring – finished September 10, 2019.
Dark Academia: James Hilton: Was It Murder? – finished September 1, 2019.
Modern Noir: Joy Ellis: The Guilty Ones – finished September 21, 2019.

Ghost Stories: Nina Blazon: Siebengeschichten – finished September 1, 2019.
Gothic: Peter Ackroyd: Hawksmoor – finished September 9, 2019.
Free (Raven) Space: Agatha Christie: The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories – finished September 7, 2019.
Truly Terrifying: Bob Berman: Earth-Shattering – finished September 12, 2019.
Amateur Sleuth: Priscilla Royal: Wine of Violence – finished September 5, 2019.

Cryptozoologist: Terry Pratchett: Guards! Guards! – finished September 18, 2019.
Diverse Voices: Toni Morrison: Beloved – finished September 22, 2019.
Black Cat: Jim Butcher: The Aeronaut’s Windlass – finished September 16, 2019.
Creepy Crawlies: Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Gods of Jade and Shadow – finished September 7, 2019.
Country House Mystery: Anthony Rolls: Scarweather – finished September 14, 2019.

Spellbound: Zen Cho: Sorcerer to the Crown – finished September 6, 2019.
A Grimm Tale: Ellen Datlow & Terry Windling (eds.): The Wolf at the Door and Other Retold Fairy Tales – finished September 4, 2019.
Creepy Carnivals: Fredric Brown: The Dead Ringer – finished September 12, 2019.
Paint It Black: Trudi Canavan: The Magicians’ Guild – finished September 20, 2019.
Cozy Mysteries: Margery Allingham: The White Cottage Mystery – finished September 19, 2019.

 

My Square Markers

 

Called but not read

Read but not called

Read and Called

Center Square: Read and Called

 

The Extra Squares / Card and Books:

13: Rex Stout: And Be a Villain
Supernatural: Jennifer Estep: Kill the Queen
New Release: Sara Collins: The Confessions of Frannie Langton
Genre: Mystery: Catherine Louisa Pirkis: The Experiences of Loveday Brooke, Lady Detective
Romantic Suspense: Georgette Heyer: The Unfinished Clue
Terror in a Small Town: Ann Cleeves: Raven Black
Halloween: Agatha Christie: Hallowe’en Party
Monsters: Terry Pratchett: Pyramids
Shifters: Joan D. Vinge: Ladyhawke
Sleepy Hollow: Dennis Lehane: The Given Day
Film at 11: J.B. Priestley: An Inspector Calls
In the Dark, Dark Woods: Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness
Free (Raven) Square: Various Authors: The Rivals: Tales of Sherlock Holmes’ Rival Detectives
Grave or Graveyard: Kathy Reichs: Grave Secrets
Genre: Suspense: Tony Medawar (ed.) & Various Authors: Bodies from the Library 2
Southern Gothic: Sharyn McCrumb: The Unquiet Grave
Baker Street Irregulars: Joanne Harris: Gentlemen & Players
Darkest London: J.V. Turner: Below the Clock
Magical Realism: Joanne Harris: Chocolat
It was a dark and stormy night: Peter May: The Lewis Man
Full Moon: Edmund Crispin: Glimpses of the Moon
King of Fear: John Le Carré: Absolute Friends
Serial / Spree Killer: Steven Kramer, Paul Holes & Jim Clemente: Evil Has a Name
Classic Noir: Patricia Highsmith: Strangers on a Train
Classic Horror: Matthew G. Lewis: The Monk

Note: With regard to the extra squares, I added the image for the relevant square for every book completed (= “read”); and I am using my “called” markers for the main card to indicate “called and read”.

 

My Spreadsheet:

My Book Preselections Post: HERE

 

My Transfiguration Spells

Not used.

 

My “Virgin” Bingo Card:

Posted for ease of tracking and comparison.

 

 

Original post:
http://themisathena.booklikes.com/post/1942220/halloween-bingo-2019-tracking-post

Halloween Bingo 2019: Thirteenth Extra Square – Free (Raven / Poe) Square

Well, as it turns out I’m halfway through another bingo card with the extra squares, so I may as well try and see whether I’ll get it together until the end of the month.  So that means another Raven square … for which this entertaining Golden Age mystery radio anthology seems like just the thing.

 

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1968441/halloween-bingo-2019-thirteenth-extra-square

Ernest Bramah: The Tales of Max Carrados

A Blind Sherlock Holmes


Ernest Bramah’s tales of the independently wealthy, blind amateur detective Max Carrados were once featured in Strand Magazine alongside Arthur Conan Dolye’s Sherlock Holmes stories, and jointly with those and R. Austin Freeman’s Dr. Thorndyke narratives they carried the distinction of having been singled out by George Orwell as “the only detective stories since Poe that are worth rereading.”  Yet, like so much of Golden Age crime fiction their reputation didn’t survive their own time, and once more it is thanks to Martin Edwards that I have discovered them … though a resounding shout-out is due to Person of Interest for pointing me to this delicious audio version narrated by Stephen Fry.

Carrados has lost his eyesight as a consequence of a riding accident; he is suffering from the type of blindness known as amaurosis, i.e., vision loss that occurs without an apparent lesion affecting the eye.  (And yes, I looked that one up.)  Due to this fact, and also because he has since trained his other senses to replace his lost visual faculties, Carrados’s blindness is not always immediately spotted by his interlocutors, and Bramah has great fun setting up these types of situations over and over — a bit too much fun for the sake of credibility, in fact:  Martin Edwards quotes Bramah as having intended to highlight the “extraordinary achievements of blind people over the years,” making special note of the fact that “many of the realities of fact have been deemed too improbable to be transferred to fiction.”  Yet, Bramah’s intent was quite obviously also to create a blind “great detective” in the same league as Sherlock Holmes — whose methods of detection and sudden pronouncements of a solution that has been obvious to him alone while everybody else is still (figuratively) groping about in the dark are strikingly similar to Carrados’s … or rather, vice versa — and in his intent to combine detective superpowers with an apparently severely crippling impairment Bramah overshoots the mark occasionally.  Only rarely do we  experience Carrados as much at the mercy of his seeing opponents as in the last story contained in this collection, “The Missing Witness Sensation.”

Nevertheless, Bramah’s style is engaging and the stories, which in this collection range from 1914 — the year of Carrados’s first appearance — into the 1920s, are great fun to follow along, particularly of course when narrated by the one and only Stephen Fry.  (If it hadn’t been for him I’d have given this collection a 4-star rating, but that just simply wouldn’t have done justice to Fry’s reading.  So only a half-star reduction remains to mark the fact that Carrados’s faculties on occasion strain credibility.)  Not all of the mysteries concern murder; again like Sherlock Holmes, Carrados — who in addition to being a detective is also an expert in numismatics — is also called upon in particularly devious instances of theft and fraud.  And once more like the denizen of 221b Baker Street, Carrados has his Watson, a disbarred-lawyer-turned-professional-private-detective named Carlyle (a former school fellow of Carrados’s; they meet again in their respective changed circumstances in the very first story, “The Coin of Dionysus,” where Carlyle consults Carrados in his numismatic capacity, only to briskly unveil the would-be-detective), as well as a valet and driver named Parkinson, who very helpfully has a photographic memory. — The stories are told from a third person narrative perspective, however, and neither Carlyle nor Parkinson appear in every single one of them.

In the context of the Detection Club bingo based on Martin Edwards’s Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books, this fulfills chapter / square 1, “A New Era Dawns.”

In the context of the Halloween bingo, this would match the “Amateur Sleuth,” “Murder Most Foul” and “Darkest London” squares; some of the stories would also qualify as “Locked Room Mysteries.”

The Detection Club bingo card:

 

 

Original post:
ThemisAthena.booklikes.com/post/1606216/a-blind-sherlock-holmes